Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 14–32 | Cite as

Student autonomy and course value: The unique and cumulative roles of various teacher practices

  • Erika A. Patall
  • Amy L. Dent
  • Melissa Oyer
  • Susan R. Wynn
Original Paper

Abstract

High school students (N = 278) in 30 classrooms with ten teachers (grades 9 through 12) reported on teacher practices in a single course, autonomy need satisfaction, and value for that course. Using hierarchical linear modeling, results indicated that student perceptions of teachers providing choices and engaging in perspective-taking to a greater extent uniquely related to greater autonomy need satisfaction. Subsequent analyses suggested that students’ autonomy need satisfaction was greatest when they perceived that teachers also identified the importance and usefulness of coursework and considered students’ interests and opinions in course activities. Provision of choice and perspective-taking related to greater course value through autonomy need satisfaction, while identifying the importance and usefulness of course activities had only direct positive effects on course value. The pattern of total, direct, and indirect effects was slightly different depending on the component of course value. Results underscore the importance of including provision of choice in conceptualizations of teacher autonomy support.

Keywords

Choice Autonomy-support Motivation Course value Teacher practices 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erika A. Patall
    • 1
  • Amy L. Dent
    • 2
  • Melissa Oyer
    • 3
  • Susan R. Wynn
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology and NeuroscienceDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychological Studies in EducationTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Program in EducationDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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