Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 444–460 | Cite as

Performance and learning goals for emotion regulation

Original Paper

Abstract

Goal orientation theory is concerned with performance and learning goals in academic, athletic, and other ability areas. Here we examine performance and learning goals for emotion regulation. We define performance goals for emotion regulation as seeking to prove one’s ability to manage emotions; learning goals for emotion regulation are defined as seeking to improve one’s ability to manage emotions. In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that performance goals for emotion regulation would be associated with greater use of defensive emotion regulation strategies and depressive symptoms. Results from both studies showed that individuals with greater performance goals for emotion regulation reported higher levels of rumination and thought suppression and greater depressive symptoms, while individuals with greater learning goals reported greater use of cognitive reappraisal. The findings suggest that goals for emotion regulation may help explain individual differences in use of defensive versus constructive emotion regulation strategies.

Keywords

Emotion regulation Goal orientation Performance goals Rumination Depression 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported in part by a Faculty Research Awards Committee grant from Tufts University. The authors are grateful to Johnmarshall Reeve for his editorial guidance, and to Anna Drapkin, Lindsay Fogerty, Charlene Gay, Dominique Lieu, Linda Sullivan, and Eden Wall for their assistance with the research, and to Hee-Sun Lee and Kristen Bethke Wendell for advice on the initial draft.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Eliot-Pearson Department of Child DevelopmentTufts UniversityMedfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyThe Hebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA

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