Minds and Machines

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 1–10 | Cite as

The status of machine ethics: a report from the AAAI Symposium

Original Paper

Abstract

This paper is a summary and evaluation of work presented at the AAAI 2005 Fall Symposium on Machine Ethics that brought together participants from the fields of Computer Science and Philosophy to the end of clarifying the nature of this newly emerging field and discussing different approaches one could take towards realizing the ultimate goal of creating an ethical machine.

Keywords

Artificial intelligence Machine ethics 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of HartfordWest HartfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of ConnecticutStamfordUSA

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