Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 347–355 | Cite as

Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals

Scientific Contribution

Abstract

This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.

Keywords

Ethics Health care Profession Professionalism Professional ethics Social contract Social responsibilities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Professor of Health Care EthicsCenter for Health Policy and Ethics, Creighton UniversityOmahaUSA

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