Advertisement

Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 740–754 | Cite as

The Heart of the Meaning: Honoring the Work of Byron J. Good

  • Atwood D. Gaines
Honors
In this, the last Honors Essay, we privilege the career and work of anthropologist Byron J Good of Harvard University and Harvard Medical School. Professor Good is a past, long-time Editor-in-Chief (1986–1992) and Co-Editor-in-Chief with his partner, the well-known Medical Sociologist and honorary anthropologist, Dr. Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good (1992–2004). It is thus fitting to end the tradition of Honors Essays with Dr. Good, whose photo appears above but also to note the work of M-J DelVecchio Good with Byron Good.

In the following, I provide only an overview of the large body of very influential work of our honoree, some of which was done with his partner for what is now 50 years this Fall, Dr. DelVecchio Good. While we touch upon the many highlights of the work, it is far beyond the scope of the present essay to provide an in-depth critical analysis of his work. As with other honorees, it would take the entire year during which he, and the others we honored, to write such an assessment. The present essay, as with the others, points out many highlights and key concepts from the body of work of Byron Good and provides his bibliography as a resource for those interested in familiarizing themselves with the breadth and depth of his work rather than a single aspect of his large academic corpus.

Currently, this year’s CMP Honoree is Professor of Medical Anthropology in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also an Associate in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. And, he serves as the Honorary Visiting Professor in the Faculties of Psychology and Medicine in in the Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Professor Good has been concerned to engage in ethnographic research but has also been deeply engaged in practical health training and mentoring. His primary areas of research, training and mentoring are Medical, Psychological, and Psychiatric Anthropology. In Psychiatric Anthropology, he has been concerned to work on cross-cultural studies of forms of mental illness, specifically, forms of psychotic afflictions, PTSD, panic disorder and depression in Iran, Java and the US. He has developed an interest in Anthropological Theory, with special focus on current theories of subjectivity and Hauntology. Dr. Good has worked at home and abroad to develop mental health services in low resource settings such as those in Indonesia, Yogyakarta (Java) and Aceh and Southeast Asia and Islamic societies and training programs for psychiatrists for Aceh, China, Indonesia, and East/Southeast Asia. All of these endeavors are evidenced in his publication record.

His education begins not in the US, but in Nigeria (University of Nigeria). However, he completed his undergraduate work in mathematics at Goshen College in 1966. Dr. Good was raised a Mennonite). Three years later, Dr. Good received Bachelors in Divinity from Harvard University Divinity School where he read in the Comparative Study of Religions. In 1977, he earned his PhD from the University of Chicago in Social Anthropology.

Academic Positions

Professor Good began his academic appointments with an Assistant Professor position in the Departments of Psychiatry and Family Practice in the School of Medicine at the University of California at Davis. He remained there from 1976 to 1983. In the latter year, our honoree was called to the Department of Social Medicine and Health Policy at Harvard Medical School and the Department of Anthropology as an Assistant Professor. In 1986, he was promoted to the position of Associate Professor in the Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard Medical School.

The CMP Honoree was promoted to professor of Medical Anthropology in the Department of (now) Global Health and Social Medicine and Anthropology. From 1993 to 1994, he served as Acting Chair of the then Department of Social Medicine, and then Vice Chair, from 1992 to 2000. In 2000, he was named Chair of that Department, a capacity in which he served until 2006. In 2017, he was named Honorary Visiting Professor in the Faculties of Psychology and Medicine of Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, a post he will hold until 2022.

He has also held a plethora of other important appointments that include, from 1984 to 2008, the position of Director, N.I.M.H. Post-Doctoral Training Program in Clinically Relevant Medical Anthropology, Department of Social Medicine, where he trained many post-doctorates from Southeast Asia, Africa and elsewhere. And, with Dr Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, served as Director of the Training Program in International Mental Health that was supported by Fogarty International Center to provide fellowships to psychiatrists from Shanghai Mental Health Center and the Peking University Institute of Mental Health.

Further, from 2011 to 2014, he and Professor DelVecchio Good directed the International Partnership for Strengthening Health Systems in Indonesia that was a USAID-funded interuniversity program with Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The Goods were assisted by local Investigators, Prof Subandi and Dr Carla Marchira.

From 2015 and continuing to 2020, Drs Good and DelVecchio Good have, and will be, directing ‘Building a Program of Comprehensive Mental Health: Implementation and Evaluation’ of a Program of Integrated Mental Health Care in the Primary Health Care Centers of Yogyakarta. This work is funded by the Harvard-Dubai Center for Global Health Delivery.

Honors; Lectures and Awards

Lectures

Dr Good has received numerous honors. These include a most prestigious honor, the 1990 Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures at University of Rochester. This lecture series was published as his book, Medicine, Rationality and Experience in 1994. 2010 saw Dr Good called upon to deliver the R R Marett Memorial Lecture at Oxford University, UK.

Awards

Professor Good has received two major awards in his two primary fields of research and writing. These are the 2012 Society for Medical Anthropology Lifetime Mentoring Award and the 2017 Society for Psychological Anthropology Lifetime Achievement Award (pictured above). Both attest to his productive scholarly career and his important mentorship to those at home and abroad.

Editorial Boards

Dr. Good has served on the Editorial Board of this Journal, which honors him, since 1977. And, he was the Editor-in-Chief or Co-Editor of this Journal from 1986 to 2002. He served as a member of the Editorial Board for the Cambridge University Press Series in Medical Anthropology from 1990 to 1998, and on the Board of Ethnos from 1998 to 2002. During much of that time (1999–2004), he also served on the board for Anthropology and Humanism. Since 2006, he has been on the board of the Journal, Early Intervention in Psychiatry and since 2010, on the Editorial Board of Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry.

Our honoree’s professional memberships include the American Anthropological Association, Society for Medical Anthropology, Society for Psychological Anthropology of which he was a member of the Executive Committee, and was President from 2013 to 2015, the Asian Studies Association, the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatry, and the International Early Psychiatry Association.

Publications

Dr. Good’s publications, many with his partner, Dr. DelVecchio Good reflect his interests in mental illness and health as well as attending to the capacities of low resource countries as concerns mental illness. His third published article was a well-known classic in Medical Anthropology, ‘The Heart of What’s the Matter”, that appeared as the first article in the first number of the first volume of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry (1977: Vol 1, no. 1:25–58). Without doubt, this article is a classic of Medical Anthropology, one that still stimulates readers 41 years after its initial publication. It is one of the most, if not the most, downloaded article in CMP’s history and still today is downloaded in excess of once per day, every week of every month of every year. The study clearly shows the cultural complex of emotion and conception that constitute illness, that is, a key interpretive understanding of illness (heart distress) in Iran.

Professor Good’s first book is a collection of essays edited with Arthur Kleinman, titled Culture and Depression (1985). It was, and remains, one of a handful of the most important books on the subject of the most common mental affliction. The book considers the topic from ethnographic, historical, linguistic, analytic and symbolic perspectives. The text demonstrates the cross-cultural, local constructions of depressive affect suggesting that the experience and construction are not universal, the same affliction with just another name.

Early on, Dr Good produced another key article, in 1978, with Leon Eisenberg and Arthur Kleinman. The article was, Culture, Illness and Care: Clinical Lessons from Anthropologic and Cross-Cultural Research that appeared in the Annals of Internal Medicine (88:251–258). In the article, the very important point is made that the improvement of care even in industrial countries cannot be made simply with more access to professional medicine, for the vast majority of illness concerns never reach professionals; if they did, the system would be completely overwhelmed. Thus, it is clear that more biomedicine is not the answer to problems of malaise nor should it be.

Good also considered issues of the family and the impact of illness thereupon (e.g., 5, 7, 17, 28; NB: number refer to the list of article publications given below) often with the assistance of DelVecchio Good. With her, he produced several other articles that lay out the semantics of lay and medical discourses showing the key to understanding is exploring meaning imbedded in such discourse and which frames the dynamics of the clinical encounter (e.g., 15, 21, 33).

An important part of Good’s work has been the study of anxiety and anxiety disorders as he and colleagues examined their cultural patterning and bases for the consideration of their ubiquity (e.g., 22, 29). A key interest of both Good and DelVecchio Good has been the nature of diagnosis in lay and biomedical contexts (27, 28, 33, 52, etc.) with what concerns largely mental illnesses. However, Good also has considered what some would call material illness, i.e., cancer (e.g., 33, 34,37) which led to considerations of ‘pain as a human experience’ (37–40).

Emotion, too, has found a place in the work of the Goods. This includes their consideration of the state construction of affect as well as locally derived affect (29, 30). Such affect may derive from violence as well as local constructions of distress as well as that of the state. Relevant here is the Goods’ work on postcolonial disorders in the book of the same name (2008) and where negative affect is structurally related (85, 86).

The Good’s first area of long-term research was Iran and they have not neglected to consider carefully the ethnographic data from the area in their studies, including Good’s the Heart of What’s the Matter. They have considered indigenous notions of affliction such as fright illness as well as the patterning of affect in the local cultural world (13, 20, 23, etc.). Related to the Islamic religion of one of the Good’s ethnographic homes, they produced an excellent study on Greco-Islamic medicine that is a must read for its approach and findings (41).

In considering the clinical contexts here and abroad, the Goods discerned a key ingredient often overlooked by social science researchers; that is, how do physicians come to be and think as they do? Several of their studies explored this and noted the pervasiveness and singular persuasiveness of the biological model of illness for medical students and practitioners (e.g., 46, 68). The Goods have also done considerable work on the dispossessed, those with little or no access to health care, in the US and elsewhere whose plight is often ignored in lieu of seeing only the biological dysfunctions (55, 59, 67, 74, etc.).

An important aspect of Good’s (and the Goods’) published corpus is a focus on narrative, but also on subjectivity (78, 82, 83, 85, 86, 99) of the afflicted and the laity as well as a refinement of the concept of subjectivity itself (82). Part of a consideration of subjectivity in illness is a consideration of the context of affliction, such as violence and trauma (83, 84, 89, 111, 113). Dr Good’s book, edited with psychiatrist Devon Hinton, Panic Disorders (2009) is a landmark in the study of that (or those) condition (88). As well, we note that rather than prejudging a condition, thus westernizing it, he, and DelVecchio Good have studied undefined “psychoses” or “madness” rather than ‘schizophrenia’ (e.g., 83, 90, 92, 94, 116, 120). A recent work, Culture and PTSD, also edited with Devon Hinton, considers issues taken up earlier, the facts of violence and trauma and their influence on daily life and on forms of affliction in specific contexts (113, 114, 118).

In addition to the issues considered above, Good (and DelVecchio Good) have deeply engaged theory in anthropology, public mental health and psychiatry. Some of the most enduring aspects of his (and their) body of work are these telling forays into theory. One thinks of Good’s book, Culture, Medicine and Rationality (the Morgan Lectures) where in Good provides for us the telling distinction in discourse and narrative of both biomedical practitioners and social scientists; the distinction between belief and knowledge. Westerners presume they have ‘knowledge’ of affliction but that those in other cultures are said to have mere ‘beliefs’. These terms simultaneously overstate one position and disvalue the other instantly biasing discussions of cross-cultural data.

Summary

We have but briefly touched upon the important ideas of Good’s career in print. There is, however, more that I was unable to cover in the limited space afforded this essay. I urge readers to go into this body of work and more fully engage with the many ideas he has presented, often in tandem with his partner, Dr DelVecchio Good, that have influenced much of Medical and Psychological/Psychiatric Anthropology.

It is a record that has kept front and center meaning in and of subjectivity, affect and narrative in order to get to the human understandings and experiences that are at the heart of the matter.

Below, the reader will find the references for the published works of Dr. Byron Good, with many co-written with Dr. Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good.

Edited Books

  1. 1.
    Arthur Kleinman and Byron Good, Editors. 1985 Culture and Depression: Studies in the Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry of Affect and Disorder. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mary-Jo D. Good, Paul Brodwin, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman, Editors. 1992 Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Shweder, Richard, and Byron Good, eds. 2004 Clifford Geertz by his Colleagues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Translated into Indonesian)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Giarelli, Guido, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Byron Good, eds. 2005 Clinical Hermeneutics. Bologna, Italy (in Italian only).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Joao Biehl, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman, Editors. 2007 Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Sandra Hyde, Sarah Pinto, and Byron Good, Editors. 2008 Postcolonial Disorders. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Devon Hinton and Byron Good, Editors. 2009 Culture and Panic Disorder. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Byron Good, Michael Fischer, Sarah Willen, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Editors. 2010 A Reader in Medical Anthropology: Theoretical Trajectories, Emergent Realities. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Devon Hinton and Byron Good, Editors. 2010 Culture and PTSD. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar

Books

  1. 10.
    Good, Byron J. 1994 Medicine, Rationality and Experience: An Anthropological Perspective (The 1990 Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures). Cambridge: Cambridge U. Press. (Translated and published in French, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, and Chinese.)Google Scholar
  2. 11.
    Desjarlais, Robert, Leon Eisenberg, Byron J. Good, and Arthur Kleinman 1995 World Mental Health: Problems and Priorities in Low Income Countries. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Special Journal Issues

  1. 1.
    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio, Byron J. Good, and Michael M.J. Fischer, Editors 1988 Emotion, Illness and Healing in Middle Eastern Societies. Special Issue of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry Vol. 12 No. 1.Google Scholar

Articles and Book Chapters

  1. 1.
    Byron J. Good. 1976 The Professionalization of Medicine in an Iranian Provincial Town. In Madeleine Leininger (ed.), Transcultural Health Care Issues and Conditions, pp. 51–65. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Co.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Byron J. Good. 1976 Medical Change and the Doctor–Patient Relationship in an Iranian Provincial Town. In Khodadad Farman-farmaian (ed.), The Social Sciences and Problems of Development, pp. 244–260. Princeton, NJ: Princeton U. Program in Near Eastern Studies.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Byron J. Good. 1977 The Heart of What’s the Matter: Semantics and Illness in Iran. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 1:25–58.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Arthur Kleinman, Leon Eisenberg, and Byron Good. 1978 Culture, Illness and Care: Clinical Lessons from Anthr-opologic and Cross–Cultural Research. Annals of Internal Medicine 88:251–258.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bill D. Burr, Byron J. Good, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1978 The Impact of Illness on the Family. In Robert Taylor (ed.), Family Medicine: Principles and Practice, pp. 221–233. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Frederick L. Dunn, and Byron J. Good. 1978 Priorities for Research to Advance the Comparative Study of Medical Systems: Summary of the Discussion at the Final Session of the Conference. Social Science and Medicine 12:135–137.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Gabriel Smilkstein, Byron Joseph Good, Toni Schaffer, and Tom Arons. 1979 The Family APGAR Index: A Study of Construct Validity. Journal of Family Practice 8:577–582.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Grant Farr, and Byron J. Good. 1980 Social Status and Fertility: A Study of a Town and Three Villages in Northwestern Iran. Population Studies 34:311–319.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Good, Byron J., and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good 1980 The Meaning of Symptoms: A Cultural Hermeneutic Model for Clinical Practice. In The Relevance of Social Science for Medicine. Leon Eisenberg and Arthur Kleinman, eds., pp. 165–196. Dordrecht, Holland: D. Reidel Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Good, Byron J., and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good 1981 The Semantics of Medical Discourse. In Sciences and Cultures. Sociology of the Sciences. Everett Mendelsohn and Yehuda Elkana, eds., Volume V, pp. 177–212. Dordrecht, Holland: D. Reidel Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Byron J. Good. 1981 The Transformation of Health Care in Modern Iranian History. In Michael E. Bonine and Nikki R. Keddie, eds., Modern Iran: The Dialectics of Continuity and Change, pp. 59–82. Albany, New York: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    D. Stumbo, M. Good, and Byron Good. 1982 Diagnostic Profile of a Family Practice Clinic: Patients with Psychosocial Diagnoses. The Journal of Family Practice 14(2): 281–285.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1982 Toward a Meaning–Centered Analysis of Popular Illness Categories: ”Fright Illness” and “Heart Distress” in Iran. In Anthony J. Marsella and Geoffrey M. White, eds., Cultural Conceptions of Mental Health and Therapy, pp. 141–166. Dordrecht, Holland: D. Reidel Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Good, Byron J. 1982 Comment on Allan Young, “When Rational Men Fall Sick.” Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 5: 358–362.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Good, Byron J., Henry Herrera, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and James Cooper. 1982 Reflexivity and Countertransference in a Psychiatric Cultural Consultation Clinic. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 6:281–303.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Byron J. Good. 1982 Patient Requests in Primary Care Clinics. In N. J. Chrisman and T. W. Maretzki, (Eds.), Clinically Applied Anthropology, pp. 275–295. Dordrecht, Holland: D Reidel Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Good, Byron J., Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Bill D. Burr 1983 Impact of Illness on the Family: Disease, Illness, and the Family Illness Trajectory. In Family Medicine: Principles and Practice. Robert Taylor, ed., pp. 32–45. New York, Springer. Reprinted in Fundamentals of Family Medicine. Robert Taylor, ed., pp. 32–45. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, and Alberta Nassi. 1983 Patient Requests in Primary Health Care Settings: Development and Validation of a Research Instrument. Journal of Behavioral Medicine 6:151–168.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio, Byron Good, and Diane Stumbo 1983 Factors Affecting the Viability of Rural Hospitals: A Survey of 61 California Hospitals. Public Service Research Review, No. 7: 1–11. Davis, CA: University of California, Davis.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Byron Good, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1984 The Azeri Turks of Iran. In Richard Weekes (Ed.), The Handbook of Muslim Peoples, Vol. I, pp. 67–73. Greenwich, Conn.: Westwood Press.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Good, Byron J., Henry Herrera, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and James Cooper 1985 Reflexivity, Countertransference and Clinical Ethnography: A Case from a Psychiatric Cultural Consultation Clinic. In Physicians of Western Medicine. Robert Hahn and Atwood Gaines, eds., pp. 177–192. Dordrecht: D. Reidel Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman. 1985 Culture and Anxiety: Cross–Cultural Evidence for the Patterning of Anxiety Disorders. In A. Hussain Tuma and Jack D. Maser (Eds.), Anxiety and the Anxiety Disorders, pp. 297–323. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Byron J. Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Robert Moradi. 1985 The Interpretation of Dysphoric Affect and Depressive Illness in Iranian Culture. In Arthur Kleinman and Byron Good (Eds.), Culture and Depression. Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Arthur Kleinman, and Byron Good. 1985 Introduction. In Arthur Kleinman and Byron Good (Eds.), Culture and Depression. Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Byron Good and Arthur Kleinman. 1985 Epilogue: Culture and Depression. In Arthur Kleinman and Byron Good (Eds.). Culture and Depression. Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Byron J. Good. 1986 Explanatory Models and Care-Seeking: A Critical Account. In S. McHugh and M. Vallis (Eds.). Illness Behavior: A Multidisciplinary Conceptualization. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Byron J. Good, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1986 The Cultural Context of Diagnosis and Therapy: A View from Medical Anthropology. In Manuel R. Miranda and Harry H.L. Kitano (Eds.). Mental Health Research & Practice in Minority Communities. Pp. 1-27. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, and Paul D. Cleary. 1987 Do Patient Attitudes Influence Physician Recognition of Psychosocial Problems in Primary Care? Journal of Family Practice 25:53-59.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, and Michael M.J. Fischer. 1988 Introduction: Discourse and the Study of Emotion, Illness and Healing. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 12: 1-7.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Byron J. Good. 1988 Ritual, the State, and the Transformation of Emotional Discourse in Iranian Society. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 12: 43-63.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Good, Byron J. Comment on C. H. Browner, et al. 1988 A Methodology for Cross-Cultural Ethnomedical Research. Current Anthropology 29:693–694.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Byron J. Good. 1989 “Disabling Practitioners”: Hazards of Learning to Be a Doctor in American Medical Education. Journal of Orthopsychiatry 59:303-309.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Stuart E. Lind, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Steven Seidel, Thomas Csordas, and Byron J. Good. 1989 Telling the Diagnosis of Cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology 7: 583-589.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, Cynthia Schaffer, and Stuart E. Lind. 1990 American Oncology and the Discourse on Hope. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 14:59-79.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Peter J. Guarnaccia, Byron J. Good, and Arthur Kleinman. 1990 A Critical Review of Epidemiological Studies of Puerto Rican Mental Health. American Journal of Psychiatry 147:1149-1156.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Janis H. Jenkins, Arthur Kleinman, and Byron J. Good. 1991 Cross-Cultural Aspects of Depression. In J. Becker and Arthur Kleinman (Eds.), Advances in Affective Disorders. Pp. 67-99. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    S.E. Lind, M.-J. DelVecchio Good, C.S. Minkovitz, & B.J. Good. 1991 Oncologists Vary in their Willingness to Undertake Anti-Cancer Therapies. British Journal of Cancer 64:391-395.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Byron J. Good. 1992 A Body in Pain – The Making of a World of Chronic Pain. In M. Good, P. Brodwin, B. Good, and A. Kleinman (Eds.), Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective. Berkeley: U. of California Press.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Arthur Kleinman, Paul Brodwin, Byron J. Good, and Mary-Jo D. Good. 1992 Chronic Pain as Human Experience. In Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Paul Brodwin, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman (Eds.), Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, Arthur Kleinman, and Paul Brodwin. 1992 Epilogue. In Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Paul Brodwin, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman (Eds.), Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1992 The Comparative Study of Greco-Islamic Medicine: The Integration of Medical Knowledge into Local Symbolic Contexts. In A. Young and C. Leslie, Eds., Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge. Los Angeles, U. of California Press.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Byron J. Good. 1992 Culture and Psychopathology: Directions for Psychiatric Anthropology. In Theodore Schwartz, Geoffrey White, and Catherine A. Lutz (Eds.), New Directions in Psychological Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge U. Press.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Farmer, Paul, and Byron J. Good 1992 Illness Representations in Medical Anthropology: A Critical Review and a Case Study of the Representation of AIDS in Haiti. In The Mental Representation of Health and Illness. J.A. Skelton, and Robert T. Croyle, eds. Springer-Verlag Series, Contributions to Psychology and Medicine.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Byron J. Good. 1992 Culture, Diagnosis and Comorbidity. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 16:427-446.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    N.C. Ware, R. Desjarlais, T. AvRuskin, J. Breslau, B.J. Good, S.M. Goldfinger. 1992 Empowerment and the Transition to Housing for Persons Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill: An Anthropological Perspective. New England Journal of Public Policy 8:297-314.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1993 Learning Medicine. In S. Lindenbaum and M. Lock (Eds.), Knowledge, Power, and Practice: The Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday Life. Los Angeles, U. of California Press.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1993 Au Mode subjonctif. Anthropologie et Sociétés 17(1-2):21-42.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, T. Munakata, Y. Kobayashi, C. Mattingly, B. J. Good. 1994 Oncology and Narrative Time. Social Science and Medicine 38(6): 855-862.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1994 In the Subjunctive Mode: Epilepsy Narratives in Turkey. Social Science and Medicine 38(6): 835-842.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Linda C. Garro, Karen A. Stephenson, and Byron J. Good. 1994 Chronic Illness of the Temporomandibular Joints as Experienced by Support-group Members. Journal of General Internal Medicine 9(July):372-378.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Byron J. Good. 1995 Medical Anthropology Today: Reply to reviews by Judith Farquhar and Benjamin N. Colby of Medicine, Rationality and Experience. Current Anthropology 36 (2): 392-395.Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Byron J. Good. 1996 Culture and DSM-IV: Diagnosis, Knowledge and Power. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 20: 127-132.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Byron J. Good. 1996 Cultural Comments on Mood and Anxiety Disorders: II. In Juan E. Mezzich, Arthur Kleinman, Horacio Fabrega, Jr. and Delores L. Parron, Eds. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis: A DSM-IV Perspective. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, pp. 123-129.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Byron J. Good. 1996 Epilogue: Knowledge, Power, and Diagnosis. In Juan E. Mezzich, Arthur Kleinman, Horacio Fabrega, Jr., and Delores L. Parron, Eds. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis: A DSM-IV Perspective. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, pp. 347-351.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Byron J. Good. 1996 Mental Health Consequences of Displacement and Resettlement. Economic and Political Weekly [New Delhi] XXXI(24):1504-1508.Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Byron J. Good. 1996 Gli studi culturali nelle innovazione bioscienze, nella biomedicina e nella biotecnologia. In Pino Donghi, Ed. Il sapere della guarigione. Spoleto, Italy: Laterza. Pp. 63-81.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Byron J. Good. 1997 Studying Mental Illness in Context: Local, Global, or Universal? Ethos 25(2): 1-19.Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Byron J. Good and Stephen Kunitz. 1997 Task Group II: Macrosocial Influences on Minority Health. Journal of Gender, Culture, and Health 2(2): 113-126.Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Stephen M. Goldfinger, Russell K. Schutt, George S. Tolomiczenko, Winston M. Turner, Norma Ware, Walter E. Penk, Mark S. Abelman, Tara L. AvRuskin, Joshua Breslau, Brina Caplan, Barbara Dickey, Olinda Gonzalez, Byron Good, Sondra Hellman, Susan Soyoung Lee, Martha O’Bryan, and Larry J. Seidman. 1997 Housing Persons Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill: Evolving Consumer Households. In William R. Breakey and James W. Thompson, Eds. Mentally Ill and Homeless: Special Programs for Special Needs. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Byron J. Good. 1998 Culture and Psychotherapy: Clinical Issues in Cross-Cultural Settings. Culture and Psyche: Japanese Journal of Transcultural Psychiatry 3(1):4-20 (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Juan E. Mezzich, Arthur Kleinman, Delores L. Parron, Keh-Ming Lin, Laurence J. Kirmayer, Horacio Fabrega, Jr., Byron J. Good, and Spero M. Manson. 1999 The Place of Culture in DSM-IV. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 187(8): 457-464.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 1999 Medici cyborg e soteriologie tecnico-scientifiche. KOS: Rivista di medicina, cultura e scienze umane 165(June): 32-35. (in Italian)Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron J. Good. 2000 Clinical Narratives and the Study of Contemporary Doctor-Patient Relationships. In Gary L. Albrecht, Ray Fitzpatrick and Susan C. Scrimshaw, Eds. The Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine. London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron J. Good. 2000 “Parallel Sisters”: Medical Anthropology and Medical Sociology. In Chloe Bird, Peter Conrad, and Allen Fremont (Eds.), The Handbook of Medical Sociology, pp. 377-388. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron J. Good. 2000 Editorial. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 24(1):1-3.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Byron J. Good. 2000 The Heart of What’s the Matter: The Semantics of Illness in Iran. In S. van der Geest and A. Rienks, Eds. The Art of Medical Anthropology: Readings. Amsterdam: Het Spinhuis Publishers.Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    Norma C. Ware, William S. Lachicotte, Suzanne R. Kirschner, Dharma E. Cortes, and Byron J. Good. 2000 Clinician Experiences of Managed Mental Health Care: A Rereading of the Threat. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 14(1): 3-27.Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2000 ‘Fiction’ and ‘Historicity’ in Doctors’ Stories: Social and Narrative Dimensions of Learning Medicine. In Cheryl Mattingly and Linda Garro, Eds., Narrative and the Cultural Construction of Illness and Healing. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Good, Byron J. with Subandi and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good 2001 Le sujet de la maladie mentale: psychose, folie furieuse et subjectivité en Indonésie. In La Maladie mentale en mutation: Psychiatrie et société. Alain Ehrenberg, and Anne M. Lovell, eds., pp. 163–195. Paris: Éditions Odile Jacob.Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2001 “Why Do the Masses So Easily Run Amuk?” Madness and Violence in Indonesian Politics. Latitudes 5 (June):10-19.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Good, Byron J. 2001 Belief, Anthropology of. In International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. N.J. Smelser and Paul B. Baltes, eds., pp. 1137–1141. Pergamon, Oxford.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    Byron J. Good. 2002 Culture and Panic Disorder: How Far Have We Come? Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 26:133-136.Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Byron J. Good. 2002 Cultural and Moral Dimensions of the Experience and Aging in a World of Cyborg Medicine and Technoscientific Soteriologies. In Antonio Guerci, Ed. Living and “Curing” Old Age in the World, volume 2. Genoa, Italy: Erga edizioni. pp. 15-20.Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio, Cara James, Byron J. Good, and Anne E. Becker 2003 The Culture of Medicine and Racial, Ethnic and Class Disparities in Health Care. In Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. Report of Institute of Medicine Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, Brian D. Smedley, Adrienne Y. Stith, and Alan R. Nelson, eds., pp. 594–625. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron J. Good. 2003 Culture in the Politics of Mental Health Research. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 27: 369-371.Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Good, Byron J. 2003 Medicina, racionalidad y experiencia. Una perspectiva antropologica. Barcelona: Edicions Bellaterra. Spanish translation of Medicine, Rationality and Experience, with a new Prologue to the Spanish Edition.Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    Byron J. Good. 2003 Kültür ve Psikoterapi: Kültürlerarası Araştırmaların Psikoterapi Uygulamaları Açısından Önemi [Culture and Psychotherapy]. In Kemal Sayar, Ed. Kültür ve Ruh Sağlığı [Culture and Mental Health]. Istanbul, Turkey: Metis. Pp. 33-55. (In Turkish)Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Byron J. Good and Subandi. 2004 Experiences of Psychosis in Javanese Culture: Reflections on a Case of Acute, Recurrent Psychosis in Contemporary Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In Janis H. Jenkins and Robert Barrett, Eds, Schizophrenia, Culture, and Subjectivity: The Edge of Experience. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    Good, Byron J., and Kleinman, Arthur. 2004 In Biographical Dictionary of Social and Cultural Anthropology. Veered Amit, ed, pp. 278–279. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    Alasdair Donald, Byron Good, Marshall Forstein, and Stuart Beck. 2004 First-Episode Psychosis: Influences of Culture and Medical Comorbidity. Harvard Review of Psychiatry 12 (5): 279-292.Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    Lawrence Hsin Yang, Arthur Kleinman, Bruce G. Link, Jo C. Phelan, Sing Lee, Byron Good. 2007 Culture and stigma: Adding Moral Experience to Stigma Theory. Social Science & Medicine 64: 1524-1535.Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    Joao Biehl, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman. 2007 Introduction: Rethinking Subjectivity. In Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations. Joao Biehl, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman, eds., pp. 1–23. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    Byron J. Good, Subandi, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2007 The Subject of Mental Illness: Psychosis, Mad Violence and Subjectivity in Indonesia. In Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations. Joao Biehl, Byron Good, and Arthur Kleinman, eds., pp. 243-272. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    Byron J. Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Jesse Grayman, Matthew Lakoma. 2007 Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Consequences in Post-Conflict Aceh: Report of an Empirical Investigation. Ataraxis: The Indonesian Journal of Mental Health 1(1):33-40.Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    Byron J. Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Sandra Teresa Hyde, and Sarah Pinto. 2008 Postcolonial Disorders: Reflections on Subjectivity in the Contemporary World. In Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Sandra Teresa Hyde, Sarah Pinto, and Byron J. Good (eds), Postcolonial Disorders. Pp. 1-40. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron J. Good. 2008 Indonesia Sakit: Indonesian Disorders and the Subjective Experience and Interpretive Politics of Contemporary Indonesian Artists. In Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Sandra Teresa Hyde, Sarah Pinto, and Byron J. Good, Eds. Postcolonial Disorders. Pp. 62-108. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    Lam, M.M.L., K.P.M. Chan, C.W. Law, C. Chiu, S.F. Hung, E.Y.H. Chen, and B.J. Good 2008 Subjective Experience of First Episode Psychosis in Hong Kong: IPSOS Report. Early Intervention in Psychiatry 2 (Supplement 1):A27, Oct 2008.Google Scholar
  88. 88.
    Byron J. Good and Devon E. Hinton. 2009 Panic Disorder in Cross-Cultural and Historical Perspective. In Devon Hinton and Byron Good, Eds. Pp. 1-30. Culture and Panic Disorder. Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    Jesse Hession Grayman, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good. 2009 Conflict Nightmares and Trauma in Aceh. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 33:290-312.Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    Constantin Tranulis, Lawrence Park, Laura Delano, Byron Good. 2009 Early Intervention in Psychosis: A Case Study on Normal and Pathological. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 33:608-622.Google Scholar
  91. 91.
    Yang Shao, Bin Xie, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good. 2010 Current Legislation on Admission of Mentally Ill Patients in China. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 33:52-57.Google Scholar
  92. 92.
    Byron J. Good, Carla Marchira, Nida Ul Hasanat, Muhana Sofiati Utami, Subandi. 2010 Is ‘Chronicity’ Inevitable for Psychotic Illness? Studying Heterogeneity in the Course of Schizophrenia in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In Chronic Conditions, Fluid States: Globalization and the Anthropology of Illness. Lenore Manderson and Carolyn Smith-Morris, eds., pp. 544–572. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Byron J. Good, and Jesse Grayman. 2010 Complex Engagements: Responding to Violence in Postconflict Aceh. In Contemporary States of Emergency: The Politics of Military and Humanitarian Interventions. Didier Fassin and Mariella Pandolfi, eds., pp. 241–266. New York: Zone Books.Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    Good, Byron J., and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good 2010 Amuk in Java: Madness and Violence in Indonesian Politics. In A Reader in Medical Anthropology: Theoretical Trajectories, Emergent Realities. Byron J Good, Michael M J Fischer, Sarah S Willen, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, eds., pp. 473–480. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    Byron J. Good. 2010 Medical Anthropology and the Problem of Belief. In Byron J Good, Michael M J Fischer, Sarah S Willen, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Eds. A Reader in Medical Anthropology: Theoretical Trajectories, Emergent Realities, pp. 473-480. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    Byron J. Good. 2010 The Complexities of Pharmaceutical Hegemonies in Indonesia. In Janis H. Jenkins, Ed. Pharmaceutical Self: The Global Shaping of Experience in an Age of Psychopharmacology. Pp. 117-144. Sante Fe, NM: SAR Press.Google Scholar
  97. 97.
    Byron J. Good. 2010 Emil Kraepelin on Pathologies of the Will. In Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Keith M. Murphy and C. Jason Throop, eds. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  98. 98.
    Tianhong Zhang, Lanlan Wang, Mary-Jo D. Good, Byron J. Good, Annabelle Chow, Yunfei Dai, Junhan Yu, Haiyin Zhang, and Zeping Xiao 2011 Prevalence of Personality Disorders Using Two Diagnostic Systems in Psychiatric Outpatients in Shanghai, China: A Comparison of Uni-Axial and Multi-Axial Formulation. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s000127-011-0445-x.
  99. 99.
    Byron J Good. 2012 Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Subjectivity in Java. Ethos 40:24-36.Google Scholar
  100. 100.
    Byron J Good. 2012 Theorizing the Subject of Medical and Psychiatric Anthropology. The 2010 Marett Lecture. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 18: 515-535.Google Scholar
  101. 101.
    Good, Byron J., and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good 2012 Il disturbo post-traumatico da stress e un concetto ‘sufficientemente buono’ per il lavoro psichiatrico sulle conseguenze dei conflitti? (Is PTSD a ‘Good Enough’ Concept for Post-Conflict Mental Health Work?) Rivista Sperimentale di Freniatria 136: 99–119. (In Italian.)Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    Byron J. Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2012 The Significance of the 686 Program for China and for Global Mental Health. Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry 24(2):175-177.Google Scholar
  103. 103.
    Tianhong Zhang, Mary-Jo D. Good, Byron J. Good, Annabelle Chow, Lanlan Wang, Yunfei Dai and Zeping Xiao. 2012 Age and Remission of Personality Pathology in the Psychotic Disorders Compared to Mood and/or Anxiety Disorders. The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 44(3):241-255.Google Scholar
  104. 104.
    Byron Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2012 “To make a difference…”: Narrative Desire in Global Medicine. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2(2):121-124.Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good and Byron Good. 2013 Perspectives on the Politics of Peace in Aceh, Indonesia. In Felicity Aulino, Miriam Goheen, and Stanley J Tambiah, Eds. Radical Egalitarianism: Contemporary Galactic Polities in Comparative Perspective. New York: Fordham University Press.Google Scholar
  106. 106.
    Good, Byron, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, and Jesse Hession Grayman 2013 A New Model for Mental Health Care? Inside Indonesia (online journal), December 2, 2013.Google Scholar
  107. 107.
    Zhang, Tian Hong, Annabelle Chow, Lan Lan Wang, Jun Han Yu, Yun Fei Dai, Xi Lu, Mary-Jo D. Good, Byron J. Good, and Ze Ping Xiao 2013 Childhood Maltreatment Profile in a Clinical Population in China: A Further Analysis of Existing Data of an Epidemiologic Survey. Comprehensive Psychiatry.Google Scholar
  108. 108.
    Lawrence H. Yang, Fang-pei Chen, Kathleen Janel Sia, Jonathan Lam, Katherine Lam, Hong Ngo, Sing Lee, Arthur Kleinman and Byron Good. 2014 “What Matters Most:” A Cultural Mechanism Moderating Structural Vulnerability and Moral Experience of Mental Illness Stigma. Social Science & Medicine 103:84-93.Google Scholar
  109. 109.
    Byron J. Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good, Sharon Abramowitz, Arthur Kleinman, Catherine Panter-Brick. 2014 Medical Humanitarianism: Research Insights in a Changing Field of Practice. Social Science & Medicine 120: 311-316.Google Scholar
  110. 110.
    Byron Good. 2014 Don Moss’s Elsewhere: An Anthropologist’s Reading of Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Man: Psychoanalysis and Masculinity. Bulletin of the Psychoanalytic Association of New York 52(1): 4-10.Google Scholar
  111. 111.
    Byron J. Good. 2015 Haunted by Aceh: Specters of Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia. In Genocide and Mass Violence: Memory, Symptom, and Recovery.Devon Hinton and Alex Hinton, eds., pp. 58-82. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  112. 112.
    Guan Lili, Jin Liu, Xia Min Wu, Dafang Chen, Xun Wang, Ning Ma, Yan Wang, Byron Good, Hong Ma, Xin Yu, and Mary-Jo Good. 2015 “Unlocking Patients with Mental Disorders Who Were in Restraints at Home: A National Follow-Up Study of China’s New Public Mental Health Initiatives.” PLoS ONE 10(4): e0121425. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0121425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. 113.
    Byron J. Good, and Devon E. Hinton. 2015 Introduction: Culture, Trauma and PTSD. In Culture and PTSD: Trauma in Global and Historical Perspective. Devon E. Hinton and Byron J. Good, eds., pp. 3-49. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  114. 114.
    Devon E. Hinton and Byron J. Good. 2015 The Culturally Sensitive Assessment of Trauma: Eleven Analytic Perspectives, a Typology of Errors, and the Multiplex Models of Distress Generation. In Devon E. Hinton and Byron J. Good, Eds. Culture and PTSD: Trauma in Global and Historical Perspective. Pp. 50-113. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  115. 115.
    Byron Good, Jesse Hession Grayman, and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2015 Humanitarianism and ‘Mobile Sovereignty’ in Strong State Settings: Reflections on Medical Humanitarianism in Aceh, Indonesia. In Sharon Abramowitz & Catherine Panter-Brick, Eds. Medical Humanitarianism: Ethnographies of Practice. Pp. 155-175. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  116. 116.
    Carla R. Marchira, Irwan Supriyanto, Subandi, Soewadi, and Byron J. Good 2015 The association between duration of untreated psychosis in first psychotic episode patients and help seeking behaviors in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. International Journal of Culture and Mental Health.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17542863.2015.1103276.Google Scholar
  117. 117.
    Byron J. Good, Jesse Grayman, Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2016 Is PTSD a ‘Good Enough’ Concept for Post-Conflict Mental Health Work? Reflections on Work in Aceh, Indonesia. In Devon E. Hinton and Byron J. Good, Eds. Culture and PTSD: Trauma in Global and Historical Perspective. Pp. 387-417. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  118. 118.
    Byron Good and Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good. 2017 Toward a Cultural Psychology of Trauma and Trauma-Related Disorders. In Julia Cassaniti and Usha Menon, Eds. Universalism without Uniformity: Exploration in Mind and Culture. Pp. 260-279. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  119. 119.
    Marchira, Carla R., Irwan Supriyanto, Subandi, Mary-Jo D. Good, and Byron Good 2017 Brief interactive psychoeducation for caregivers of patients with early phase psychosis in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Early Intervention in Psychiatry Published 20 October 2017.  https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.12506
  120. 120.
    M.A. Subandi and Byron J. Good. 2018 Shame as an Index of Illness and Recovery from Psychotic Illness in Java. Asian Journal of Psychiatry 24:23-27. 2018.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

Personalised recommendations