Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 139–143

Genetic Knowledge and Collective Identity

Introduction

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References

  1. Bosk, Charles (1992). All God's Mistakes: Genetic Counseling in a Pediatric Hospital. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
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  3. Brodwin, Paul (2005). Genetic Truth-claims and Identity Politics in the Melungeon Community. In Race, Roots, and Relations: Native and African Americans. Terry Straus, ed., pp. 156–161. Chicago: Albatross Press.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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