Metabolic Brain Disease

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 801–807 | Cite as

QPEEG analysis of the effects of sodium valproate on adult Chinese patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures

  • Jiamei Guo
  • Dan Wang
  • Min Ren
  • Bo Xiong
  • Zengyou Li
  • Xuefeng Wang
  • Kebin Zeng
Research Article

Abstract

Objectives EEG effects of the sustained-release form of sodium valproate (SR-VPA) are unknown, although it is widely used in Chinese patients with generalized tonicclonic seizures (GTCS). Methods Fourteen newly diagnosed, untreated GTCS patients were recruited and treated with SR-VPA. Waking EEG was recorded and analyzed by way of quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalogram (QPEEG) analysis during the three-month follow-up. Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the absolute power of the delta band (P < 0.05), theta band (P < 0.03) and partial alpha-1 band (p < 0.05) with treatment compared to before treatment, while there was no significantly different absolute power between one-month and three-months after treatment. There was a strong correlation between the decrease in absolute power and the degree of the initial abnormality in all frequency bands. Two of 14 patients experienced seizures during the second month after initiation of SR-VPA therapy. Conclusions SR-VPA selectively decreased the activity of the abnormal EEG synchronization in a use-dependent manner. The reduced theta, delta, and partial alpha-1 absolute power may reflect or confirm the efficacy of SR-VPA on patients with GTCS.

Keywords

Quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography Generalized tonic-clonic seizures Patients Sodium valproate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiamei Guo
    • 1
  • Dan Wang
    • 1
  • Min Ren
    • 1
  • Bo Xiong
    • 1
  • Zengyou Li
    • 1
  • Xuefeng Wang
    • 1
  • Kebin Zeng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingPeople’s Republic of China

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