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Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 269, Issue 1, pp 175–182 | Cite as

Cloning and expression of PPARγ and PGC-1α from the hibernating ground squirrel, Spermophilus tridecemlineatus

  • Sean F. EddyEmail author
  • Pier MorinJr.
  • Kenneth B. Storey
Article

Abstract

The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of transcription factors play a key role in lipid metabolism and have been implicated in a number of disease states, most notably of which is obesity. Controlled regulation of lipid metabolism is a key ingredient for successful hibernation. Partial cDNA sequences for one of the PPAR proteins, PPARγ and the PPARγ co-activator (PGC-1α) have been cloned from the hibernating ground squirrel, Spermophilus tridecemlineatus and show differential regulation during hibernation at the mRNA level using relative RT-PCR and at the protein level via immunoblotting in brown adipose tissue (BAT), heart, skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT). The cDNA sequence for PGC-1α revealed a number of amino acid substitutions and two were worthy of note, one resulting in the loss of a potential protein kinase C (PKC) site, while another resulted in the creation of a PKC site, suggesting that PKC may be important in regulating PGC-1α. RT-PCR revealed a near 2-fold up-regulation of PPARγ in BAT and to a lesser extent (< 1.5-fold) in heart and WAT, while PGC-1α displayed significantly higher levels of expression in skeletal muscle during hibernation (3.1-fold, p < 0.005). The protein levels of PPARγ were significantly increased in BAT and WAT (1.5 and 1.8-fold, respectively) while PGC-1α displayed significant changes in expression in heart (3.5-fold) and skeletal muscle (1.8-fold). Our current findings indicate a role for increased expression of PPARγ and PGC-1α in hibernating animals. (Mol Cell Biochem 269: 175–182, 2005)

Keywords

brown adipose tissue heart hibernation PPAR PGC-1α skeletal muscle gene expression protein expression 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean F. Eddy
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pier MorinJr.
    • 1
  • Kenneth B. Storey
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biochemistry and Department of ChemistryCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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