Marketing Letters

, Volume 16, Issue 3–4, pp 335–346

Choice Based on Goals

  • Stijn M. J. Van Osselaer
  • Suresh Ramanathan
  • Margaret C. Campbell
  • Joel B. Cohen
  • Jeannette K. Dale
  • Paul M. Herr
  • Chris Janiszewski
  • Arie W. Kruglanski
  • Angela Y. Lee
  • Stephen J. Read
  • J. Edward Russo
  • Nader T. Tavassoli
Article

Abstract

This article introduces a goal-based view of consumer choice in which (1) choice is influenced by three classes of goals (consumption goals, criterion goals, and process goals), (2) goals are cognitively represented, and (3) the impact of a goal on choice depends on its activation. For each class of goals, we discuss how goal activation is influenced by direct (subconscious) goal priming, by spreading activation from choice options, from other goals, and from the context, and by goal (non-)achievement. Opportunities for modeling goal-based choice, the integration of emotions in a theory of goal-based choice, and relationships with dual-process theories of decision making are discussed.

Keywords

goal-based choice goal activation consumer choice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stijn M. J. Van Osselaer
    • 1
  • Suresh Ramanathan
    • 2
  • Margaret C. Campbell
    • 3
  • Joel B. Cohen
    • 4
  • Jeannette K. Dale
    • 3
  • Paul M. Herr
    • 3
  • Chris Janiszewski
    • 4
  • Arie W. Kruglanski
    • 5
  • Angela Y. Lee
    • 6
  • Stephen J. Read
    • 7
  • J. Edward Russo
    • 8
  • Nader T. Tavassoli
    • 9
  1. 1.RSM Erasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of ChicagoChicago
  3. 3.University of Colorado
  4. 4.University of Florida
  5. 5.University of Maryland
  6. 6.Northwestern UniversityChicago
  7. 7.University of Southern California
  8. 8.Cornell University
  9. 9.London Business SchoolLondon

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