Marketing Letters

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 185–199 | Cite as

The Process of Consumer Reactions to Possession Threats and Losses in a Natural Disaster

  • Denise E. DeLorme
  • George M. Zinkhan
  • Scott C. Hagen
Article

Abstract

This paper examines involuntary possession disposition associated with a natural disaster. Results of a naturalistic investigation involving group and depth interviews with wildfire survivors are consistent with previous research proposing that disposition is a symbolic and meaningful process. Overall, these consumers’ reactions to possession threats and losses appear to follow a sequence of stages. We also find this process to have some unique characteristics that distinguish it from other types of disposition.

Keywords

consumer behavior possession disposition environment qualitative methodology 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise E. DeLorme
    • 1
  • George M. Zinkhan
    • 2
  • Scott C. Hagen
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Central FloridaOrlando
  2. 2.Department of Marketing, Terry College of BusinessThe University of GeorgiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of Central FloridaUSA

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