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Micronutrient status of populations and preventive nutrition interventions in South East Asia

  • N. Roos
  • M. Campos Ponce
  • C. M. Doak
  • M. Dijkhuizen
  • K. Polman
  • C. Chamnan
  • K. Khov
  • M. Chea
  • S. Prak
  • S. Kounnavong
  • K. Akkhavong
  • L. B. Mai
  • T. T. Lua
  • S. Muslimatun
  • U. Famida
  • E. Wasantwisut
  • P. Winichagoon
  • E. Doets
  • V. Greffeuille
  • F. T. Wieringa
  • J. Berger
Article

Abstract

Objectives Since the 1990s, programs for the control of micronutrient deficiencies became a public health priority for many governments, including the countries partnering the project “Sustainable Micronutrient Interventions to Control Deficiencies and Improve Nutritional Status and General Health in Asia” (SMILING): Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos-PDR, Thailand and Vietnam. The aim of this study was to map which micronutrient deficiencies have been addressed and which interventions were in place in the SMILING countries. Methods The mapping covered the period up to 2012. Updated information from relevant surveys after 2012 is included in this paper after the completion of the SMILING project. The mapping of micronutrient status was limited to either national or at least large-scale surveys. Information on nutrition interventions obtained through a systematic mapping of national programs combined with a snowball collection from various sources. Results Among the five SMILING countries, Thailand differed historically by an early implementation of a nationwide community-based nutrition program, contributing to reductions in undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. For Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos PDR, and Vietnam, some national programs addressing micronutrients have been implemented following adjusted international recommendations. National surveys on micronutrient status were scattered and inconsistent across the countries in design and frequency. Conclusion for practice In conclusion, some micronutrient deficiencies were addressed in national interventions but the evidence of effects was generally lacking because of limited nationally representative data collected. Improvement of intervention programs to efficiently reduce or eliminate micronutrient deficiencies requires more systematic monitoring and evaluation of effects of interventions in order to identify best practices.

Keywords

Micronutrient Deficiency Southeast Asia Vitamin Mineral Vitamin A Iron Zinc Children Women of reproductive age 

Supplementary material

10995_2018_2639_MOESM1_ESM.docx (1.1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 1155 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Roos
    • 1
  • M. Campos Ponce
    • 2
  • C. M. Doak
    • 2
  • M. Dijkhuizen
    • 1
  • K. Polman
    • 2
  • C. Chamnan
    • 3
  • K. Khov
    • 3
  • M. Chea
    • 4
  • S. Prak
    • 4
  • S. Kounnavong
    • 5
  • K. Akkhavong
    • 5
  • L. B. Mai
    • 6
  • T. T. Lua
    • 6
  • S. Muslimatun
    • 7
  • U. Famida
    • 7
  • E. Wasantwisut
    • 8
  • P. Winichagoon
    • 8
  • E. Doets
    • 9
  • V. Greffeuille
    • 10
  • F. T. Wieringa
    • 10
  • J. Berger
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS)University of CopenhagenFrederiksbergDenmark
  2. 2.Institute of Health SciencesUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.The Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality Control (DFPTQ)Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesPhnom PenhCambodia
  4. 4.National Maternal and Child Health CenterMinistry of HealthPhnom PenhCambodia
  5. 5.National Institute of Public HealthMinistry of HealthVientianeLao People’s Democratic Republic
  6. 6.National Institute of NutritionMinistry of HealthHanoiVietnam
  7. 7.SouthEast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO), Regional Centre for Food and NutritionJakartaIndonesia
  8. 8.Institute of NutritionMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  9. 9.WU – Wageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  10. 10.Nutripass, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD)MontpellierFrance

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