Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 725–734 | Cite as

Social Factors Associated with Non-initiation and Cessation of Predominant Breastfeeding in a Mother–Child Cohort in Spain

  • Maria Villar
  • Loreto Santa-Marina
  • Mario Murcia
  • Pilar Amiano
  • Silvia Gimeno
  • Ferran Ballester
  • Jordi Julvez
  • Dora Romaguera
  • Ana Fernández-Somoano
  • Adonina Tardón
  • Jesús Ibarluzea
Article
  • 127 Downloads

Abstract

Objective The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with non-initiation and cessation of predominant breastfeeding (PBF) in a mother–child cohort from Spain. Materials and Methods The analysis included 2195 mother-infant from birth to 14 months post- delivery recruited between 2004 and 2008. Maternal characteristics were collected during the pregnancy. Lactation data were obtained at 6 and 14 months after delivery. PBF was defined as intake of breast milk plus liquids like juices or water. The PBF cessation was calculated using the date that women started PBF and the date that she reported to start giving infant formula and/or food. The relationship between maternal variables and PBF initiation and cessation was modeled using logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results The prevalence of PBF at hospital discharge was 85.3, 53.4% at 3 months, 46.1% at 4 months and 7.2% at 6 month. Only two women continued PBF at 12 months and none at 14 months. The initiating of PBF was associated with higher levels of maternal education, being a first-time mother and worked in a non-manual occupation. Higher level of physical activity, not smoking and having a healthy BMI, were also positively associated with PBF initiation. PBF cessation was higher in young, obese women, who had had complications during the pregnancy, and who had lower levels of education and smoked. The employment status of women, in week 32 of pregnancy and also in month 14 post-delivery, determined likelihood of PBF cessation. Conclusions Healthier habits and education positively influenced PBF initiation and duration. Decrease in PBF duration rates in Spain can be interpreted in part as a consequence of women returning to work.

Keywords

Breastfeeding Predominant breastfeeding Socioeconomic factors Life style 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would particularly like to thank to the INMA families for their contribution in the study. The authors are grateful to all fieldworkers for their assistance in contacting the families and administering the questionnaires. A full listing of the INMA project researchers can be found at: http://www.proyectoinma.org/presentacioninma/listadoinvestigadores/en_listadoinvestigadores.html.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Villar
    • 1
  • Loreto Santa-Marina
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mario Murcia
    • 2
    • 5
  • Pilar Amiano
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Silvia Gimeno
    • 4
  • Ferran Ballester
    • 2
    • 5
  • Jordi Julvez
    • 2
    • 6
    • 7
  • Dora Romaguera
    • 8
  • Ana Fernández-Somoano
    • 9
  • Adonina Tardón
    • 9
  • Jesús Ibarluzea
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Health Research InstituteBiodonostiaSan SebastiánSpain
  2. 2.Spanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP)BarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.Public Health Division of GipuzkoaBasque GovernmentSan SebastiánSpain
  4. 4.FISABIOValenciaSpain
  5. 5.Epidemiology and Environmental Health Joint Research UnitFISABIO-Universitat Jaume I-Universitat de ValènciaValenciaSpain
  6. 6.ISGlobal Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL)BarcelonaSpain
  7. 7.Hospital del Mar Research InstituteBarcelonaSpain
  8. 8.Research UnitUniversity Hospital Son EspasesPalmaSpain
  9. 9.Departamento de MedicinaUniversidad de OviedoOviedoSpain

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