Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 1469–1478 | Cite as

Comparison of Self-reported and Measured Pre-pregnancy Weight: Implications for Gestational Weight Gain Counseling

  • Annika L. Bannon
  • Molly E. Waring
  • Katherine Leung
  • Jessica V. Masiero
  • Julie M. Stone
  • Elizabeth C. Scannell
  • Tiffany A. Moore Simas
Article

Abstract

Objectives To examine clinical and demographic characteristics associated with availability of self-reported and measured pre-pregnancy weight, differences in these parameters, and characteristics associated with self-report accuracy. Methods Retrospective cohort of 7483 women who delivered at a large academic medical center between 2011 and 2014. Measured pre-pregnancy weights recorded within a year of conception and self-reported pre-pregnancy weights reported anytime during pregnancy were abstracted from electronic medical records. Difference in weights was calculated as self-reported minus measured pre-pregnancy weight. Logistic and linear regression models estimated associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, and presence of self-reported and measured weights, and weight differences. Results 42.2% of women had both self-reported and measured pre-pregnancy weight, 49.7% had only self-reported, and 2.8% had only measured. Compared to white women, black women and women of other races/ethnicities were less likely to have self-reported weight, and black, Asian, and Hispanic women, and women of other races/ethnicities were less likely to have measured weights. For 85%, pre-pregnancy BMI categorized by self-reported and measured weights were concordant. Primiparas and multiparas were more likely to underreport their weight compared to nulliparas (b = −1.32 lbs, 95% CI −2.24 to −0.41 lbs and b = −2.74 lbs, 95% CI −3.82 to −1.67 lbs, respectively). Discussion Utilization of self-reported or measured pre-pregnancy weight for pre-pregnancy BMI classification results in identical categorization for the majority of women. Providers may wish to account for underreporting for patients with a BMI close to category cutoff by recommending a range of gestational weight gain that falls within recommendations for both categories where feasible.

Keywords

Pre-pregnancy BMI Self-reported weight Prenatal care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annika L. Bannon
    • 1
  • Molly E. Waring
    • 1
    • 2
  • Katherine Leung
    • 1
  • Jessica V. Masiero
    • 1
  • Julie M. Stone
    • 1
    • 3
  • Elizabeth C. Scannell
    • 1
    • 4
  • Tiffany A. Moore Simas
    • 1
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Research, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Quantitative Health SciencesUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics & GynecologyUniversity of Connecticut School of MedicineFarmingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Obstetrics & GynecologyMount Sinai Beth Israel, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School, UMass Memorial Health CareWorcesterUSA

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