Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 20, Issue 7, pp 1341–1348

Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas

  • Elizabeth A. Smulian
  • Leilah Zahedi
  • Julie Hurvitz
  • Abigail Talbot
  • Audra Williams
  • Zoë Julian
  • Adrienne D. Zertuche
  • Roger Rochat
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10995-016-1998-9

Cite this article as:
Smulian, E.A., Zahedi, L., Hurvitz, J. et al. Matern Child Health J (2016) 20: 1341. doi:10.1007/s10995-016-1998-9

Abstract

Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia’s obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia’s OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees’ strong concerns about Georgia’s political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia.

Keywords

Access Obstetrics Training programs OB/GYN residents Certified nurse midwives 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth A. Smulian
    • 1
  • Leilah Zahedi
    • 2
  • Julie Hurvitz
    • 2
  • Abigail Talbot
    • 1
    • 2
  • Audra Williams
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zoë Julian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Adrienne D. Zertuche
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roger Rochat
    • 1
  1. 1.Emory University Rollins School of Public HealthAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Emory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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