Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 887–893

Postpartum Depression Prevalence and Impact on Infant Health, Weight, and Sleep in Low-Income and Ethnic Minority Women and Infants

  • Jenna L. Gress-Smith
  • Linda J. Luecken
  • Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant
  • Rose Howe
Article
  • 2.3k Downloads

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms at 5 and 9 months postpartum in a low-income and predominantly Hispanic sample, and evaluate the impact on infant weight gain, physical health, and sleep at 9 months. Participants included 132 low-income mother-infant pairs who participated in a larger investigation on prenatal care utilization. Mothers were interviewed in person 24–48 h after birth and by phone at 5 and 9 months postpartum. Clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms were reported in 33% of the women at 5 months postpartum, and 38% at 9 months postpartum. Higher depressive symptoms at 5 months were associated with less infant weight gain from 5 to 9 months, p = .002, increased infant physical health concerns, p = .05, and increased infant nighttime awakenings at 9 months, p = .001. Results suggest a striking prevalence of clinically significant depressive symptoms through 9 months postpartum in this very low income, largely ethnic minority sample. Further, the effects of postpartum depression include significant ramifications for infant physical health.

Keywords

Postpartum depression Body weight Infant Sleep 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenna L. Gress-Smith
    • 1
  • Linda J. Luecken
    • 1
  • Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant
    • 1
  • Rose Howe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Maricopa County Department of Public HealthPhoenixUSA

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