Factors for Accessing a Medical Home Vary Among CSHCN from Different Levels of Socioeconomic Status

  • Kimberly G. Fulda
  • Kristine Lykens
  • Sejong Bae
  • Karan Singh
Article

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this research study was to identify factors that are associated with receiving care in a medical home for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and to identify how these factors vary among different socioeconomic levels. Methods Data were obtained from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2000–2002. Access to a medical home was derived using an algorithm. This survey analysis also included demographic characteristics, geographical location of household, severity of condition, and social factors. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed for socioeconomic status (SES) levels defined by federal poverty level (FPL): <133%; 133–199%; 200–299%; ≥300%. Results Age group was significant in all but the 200–299% of FPL stratum. Severity of condition was significant in all strata. Race was significant in all but the ≥300% stratum. Maternal education was borderline significant in the lowest and highest strata. Insurance type/status was significant in all but the 133–199% of FPL stratum. Geographical location was significant in the lowest and highest strata. The language of the interview was only significant in the lowest stratum. The relationship of the respondent to the child was significant in the middle two strata. The total number of adults in the household was significant in the highest stratum, and the total number of children in the household was significant in the 200–299% of FPL stratum. Conclusions Factors affecting access to a medical home differed among socioeconomic groups. Future research should explore the CSHCN population by income groups to better serve this population.

Keywords

Medical home Children with special health care needs Socioeconomic status 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimberly G. Fulda
    • 1
  • Kristine Lykens
    • 2
  • Sejong Bae
    • 3
  • Karan Singh
    • 3
  1. 1.Primary Care Research Institute, Department of Family and Community MedicineUniversity of North Texas Health Science CenterFort WorthUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Management and PolicyUniversity of North Texas Health Science CenterFort WorthUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of North Texas Health Science CenterFort WorthUSA

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