Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 347–351

Pregnancy Intention and Contraceptive Use Among Adult Women

  • Indu B. Ahluwalia
  • Nedra Whitehead
  • Diana Bensyl
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10995-007-0180-9

Cite this article as:
Ahluwalia, I.B., Whitehead, N. & Bensyl, D. Matern Child Health J (2007) 11: 347. doi:10.1007/s10995-007-0180-9

Abstract

Objectives: We examined pregnancy intention measures and contraceptive use behaviors among reproductive-age women using data from two CDC-based surveillance systems. Methods: We analyzed data for women aged 18–44 from 4 states that collected information on pregnancy and contraceptive use from both the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS, n = 4201) and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS, n = 7761) in 2000. Standard definitions of intended and unintended pregnancy were used. Results: BRFSS data show that 4% (95% CI: 2.8–5.2) of the women were pregnant at the time of interview and that 57% (95% CI: 41.9–71.9) of these pregnancies were intended. Women who had been pregnant within the last 5 years but were not currently pregnant reported that 61% (95% CI: 55.9–65.3) of their most recent pregnancies had been intended. According to PRAMS, 58% (95% CI: 56.5–60.5) of women with live births had intended pregnancies. Contraceptive use varied across the surveys; 68% (95% CI: 65.7–70.7) of all non-pregnant women from BRFSS and 87% (95% CI: 85.1–87.9) of women with a recent live birth from PRAMS reported using contraceptives. Conclusions: Although contraceptive use differed between the BRFSS and PRAMS, the patterns of pregnancy intention were similar for women who had a pregnancy within the past 5 years, those who recently delivered a live-born infant, and those who were currently pregnant. It appears that reporting of pregnancy intention is not affected by timing of assessment across the two surveys.

Keywords

Pregnancy intention Contraceptive use Behavioral risk factor surveillance system Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Indu B. Ahluwalia
    • 1
  • Nedra Whitehead
    • 2
  • Diana Bensyl
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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