Language Policy

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 95–117 | Cite as

Teaching Chinese, Teaching in Chinese, and Teaching the Chinese

Article

Abstract

This article examines specific issues encountered in various areas of Chinese teaching in Australia. These issues are linked to the spheres of language planning as acquisition and as recovery and language planning as retention (Lo Bianco, 10.1007/s10993-006-9042-3). Specifically relevant to Chinese in Australia is its current prominence in formally declared national language policy, its changing status over time and its similarities and differences with Chinese in the United States (Wang, 10.1007/s10993-006-9043-2). The internationalization of education, and its commodification, has in recent years led to a major expansion in the range of offerings in Chinese in Australia, now catering to growing, and in some institutions to numerically dominant, groupings of native speakers with radically different language and academic needs from the traditional clientele of tertiary and school Chinese programs.

Keywords

administrative jurisdiction Chinese language education Diaspora populations and language maintenance higher education language policy and planning political sovereignty 

Abbreviations

ASAA

Asian Studies Association of Australia

ASC

Asian Studies Council

ALLC

Australian Language and Literacy Council

LOTE

Languages other than English

LPP

Language Policy and Planning

PRC

People’s Republic of China

MSC

Modern Standard Chinese

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

VELS

Victorian Essential Learning Standards

VCAA

Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of International and Political StudiesDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia
  2. 2.Language and Literacy EducationThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.The University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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