Journal of Philosophical Logic

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 367–413 | Cite as

Defaults with Priorities

Article

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Antonelli, G. A.: A directly cautious theory of defeasible consequence for default logic via the notion of a general extension, Artificial Intelligence 109 (1999), 71–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Apt, K. R., Blair, H. A., and Walker, A.: Towards a theory of declarative knowledge, in Jack Minker (ed.), Foundations of Deductive Databases and Logic Programming, Morgan Kaufmann, San Mateo, CA, 1988, pp. 89–148.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Baader, F. and Hollunder, B.: Priorities on defaults with prerequisites, and their applications in treating specificity in terminological default logic, Journal of Automated Reasoning 15 (1995), 41–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Brewka, G.: Adding priorities and specificity to default logic, in Proceedings of the European Workshop on Logics in Artificial Intelligence (JELIA-94), Springer Verlag Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1994, pp. 247–260.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Brewka, G.: Reasoning about priorities in default logic, in Proceedings of the Twelveth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-94), AAAI/MIT, 1994, pp. 940–945.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Brewka, G. and Eiter, T.: Prioritizing default logic, in St. Hölldobler (ed), Intellectics and Computational Logic: Papers in Honor of Wolfgang Bibel, Kluwer, 2000.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Delgrande, J. and Schaub, T.: Expressing preferences in default logic, Artificial Intelligence 123 (2000), 41–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Delgrande, J. and Schaub, T.: The role of default logic in knowledge representation, in J. Minker (ed.), Logic Based Artificial Intelligence, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 2000, pp. 107–126.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Delgrande, J., Schaub, T., Tompits, H., and Wang, K.: A classification and survey of preference handling approaches in nonmonotonic reasoning, Computational Intelligence 20 (2004), 308–334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Etherington, D. and Reiter, R.: On inheritance hierarchies with exceptions, in Proceedings of the Third National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-83), 1983, pp. 104–108.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Horty, J.: Moral dilemmas and nonmonotonic logic, Journal of Philosophical Logic 23 (1994), 35–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Horty, J.: Some direct theories of nonmonotonic inheritance, in D. Gabbay, C. Hogger, and J. Robinson (eds.), Handbook of Logic in Artificial Intelligence and Logic Programming, Volume 3: Nonmonotonic Reasoning and Uncertain Reasoning, Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 111–187.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Horty, J.: Argument construction and reinstatement in logics for defeasible reasoning, Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (2001), 1–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Horty, J.: Skepticism and floating conclusions, Artificial Intelligence 135 (2002), 55–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Horty, J.: Reasoning with moral conflicts, Nous 37 (2003), 557–605.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Horty, J.: Reasons as defaults. Manuscript, 2006.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Horty, J., Thomason, R, and Touretzky, D.: A skeptical theory of inheritance in nonmonotonic semantic networks, Artificial Intelligence 42 (1990), 311–348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Makinson, D.: General patterns in nonmonotonic reasoning, in D. Gabbay, C.Hogger, and J. Robinson (eds.), Handbook of Logic in Artificial Intelligence and Logic Programming, Volume 3: Nonmonotonic Reasoning and Uncertain Reasoning, Oxford University Press, 1994, pp. 35–110.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Makinson, D.: Bridges from Classical to Nonmonotonic Logic. Texts in Computing, Volume 5, King’s College Publications, 2005.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Marek, W. and Truszczyński, M.: Nonmonotonic Logic: Context-dependent Reasoning, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1993.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    McDermott, D.: Non-monotonic logic II, Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery 29 (1982), 33–57.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Pollock, J.: Cognitive Carpentry: A Blueprint for How to Build a Person, MIT, Cambridge, MA, 1995.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Reiter, R.: A logic for default reasoning, Artificial Intelligence 13 (1980), 81–132.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Reiter, R. and Criscuolo, G.: On interacting defaults, in Proceedings of the Seventh International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-81), 1981, pp. 270–276.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Rintanen, J.: Lexicographic priorities in default logic, Artificial Intelligence 106 (1998), 221–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Touretzky, D.: The Mathematics of Inheritance Systems, Morgan Kaufmann, San Mateo, CA, 1986.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Touretzky, D., Horty, J., and Thomason, R.: A clash of intuitions: the current state of nonmonotonic multiple inheritance systems, in Proceedings of the Tenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-87), Morgan Kaufmann, San Mateo, CA, 1987, pp. 476–482.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Touretzky, D., Thomason, R., and Horty, J.: A skeptic’s menagerie: conflictors, preemptors, reinstaters, and zombies in nonmonotonic inheritance, in Proceedings of the Twelfth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-91), Morgan Kaufmann, San Mateo, CA, 1991, pp. 478–483.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    van Fraassen, B.: Values and the heart’s command, The Journal of Philosophy 70 (1973), 5–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Philosophy Department and Institute for Advanced Computer StudiesUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

Personalised recommendations