Landscape Ecology

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 473–486

Multi-scale effects of landscape complexity and crop management on pollen beetle parasitism rate

  • Adrien Rusch
  • Muriel Valantin-Morison
  • Jean-Pierre Sarthou
  • Jean Roger-Estrade
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-011-9573-7

Cite this article as:
Rusch, A., Valantin-Morison, M., Sarthou, JP. et al. Landscape Ecol (2011) 26: 473. doi:10.1007/s10980-011-9573-7

Abstract

Improving our understanding about how natural enemies respond to semi-natural habitats and crop management scattered in the landscape may contribute to the development of ecologically based pest management strategies maximising biological control services. We investigated how soil tillage and semi-natural habitats influenced the parasitism rates of pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus F.) larvae at 8 different spatial scales (from 250 to 2000 m radius circular sectors) in 42 oilseed rape (OSR) fields. We used multimodel inference approaches to identify and rank the influence of soil tillage and semi-natural habitats on parasitism rates, and to quantify the importance of each scale. Parasitism rates were due to three univoltine parasitoid species (Tersilochus heterocerus, Phradis morionellus and P. interstitialis) and varied from 0 to 98%. We found that both fine and large scales contributed to explain significantly parasitism rates, indicating that biological control of pollen beetle is a multi-scale process. At the 250 m scale, parasitism rates of T. heterocerus were positively related to the proportion of semi-natural habitats and the proximity to previous year OSR fields. At large scales (1500 to 2000 m), parasitism rates of T. heterocerus were positively related to semi-natural habitats and negatively related to the proportion of previous year OSR fields with conventional soil tillage. Parasitism rates of Phradis spp. were only positively related to the proportion of semi-natural habitats at the 1250 and 1500 m scales. These multi-scale effects are discussed in relation to the influence of semi-natural habitats and soil tillage on parasitoid populations and their movement behaviours within the landscape.

Keywords

Meligethes aeneus Biological control Parasitoid Spatial scale Landscape Pest management Multimodel inference Movement behaviour Soil tillage 

Supplementary material

10980_2011_9573_MOESM1_ESM.doc (126 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 126 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrien Rusch
    • 1
  • Muriel Valantin-Morison
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Sarthou
    • 2
  • Jean Roger-Estrade
    • 3
  1. 1.INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research), UMR211 Agronomie, INRA/AgroParisTechThiverval-GrignonFrance
  2. 2.University of Toulouse, INPT-ENSAT, UMR 1201 DYNAFORCastanet TolosanFrance
  3. 3.AgroParisTech, UMR 211 Agronomie, INRA/AgroParisTechThiverval-GrignonFrance

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