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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 322, Issue 3, pp 1995–2001 | Cite as

High radioactivity levels of radium isotopes in groundwater of the Disi aquifer

  • A. Al-Qararah
  • O. Al-Qudah
  • S. Alameer
  • O. NusairEmail author
Article
  • 244 Downloads

Abstract

Elevated levels of groundwater radioactivity found in fifteen wells from the Disi aquifer in Jordan and in the main collection reservoir were investigated. The estimated annual doses in the studied wells and the reservoir are 0.53 ± 0.02 mSv yr−1 and 0.62 ± 0.02 mSv yr−1, respectively. These values are higher than the 0.1 mSv yr−1 recommended by the World Health Organization and 0.5 mSv yr−1 recommended in the Jordanian standard. However, the measured dose after mixing with surface water has decreased. Filtered tap water is recommended for drinking since the analyzed samples showed extremely low levels of radioactivity.

Keywords

Gamma-ray spectroscopy Gross alpha and gross beta counting Disi aquifer Effective annual dose Drinking groundwater 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) for performing the samples preparation and counting at JAEC’s laboratories.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physics, Faculty of ScienceTafila Technical UniversityTafilaJordan
  2. 2.Research Laboratories and InformationJordan Atomic Energy CommissionAmmanJordan
  3. 3.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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