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Natural radioactivity levels and associated radiation hazards in ophiolites around Tekirova, Kemer, and Kumluca Touristic Regions in Antalya, Turkey

  • Mustafa Gurhan Yalcin
  • Sezer Unal
Article
  • 136 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, the natural radioactivity levels of the ophiolites in the western region of Antalya, their anomaly values, and effects on human health are determined. At the end of the analysis, the radioactivity values have been found to vary between 29 and 986 Bq/kg for the 40K, 0–212 Bq/kg for 238U (Ra), and 1–104 Bq/kg for 232Th activities. Since some locations in Tekirova, Kemer, and Kumluca have been determined to have higher radioactivity levels, the people living in these areas should have a check-up.

Keywords

Natural radionuclides Gamma ray spectrometry Hazard indices Topsoil 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Scientific Research Projects of Akdeniz University (Project Number: FYL-2016-1038). The financial support of the Scientific Research Projects Office of Akdeniz University is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Engineering GeologyAkdeniz UniversityAntalyaTurkey

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