Production and isolation of homologs of flerovium and element 115 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

  • John D. Despotopulos
  • Kelly N. Kmak
  • Narek Gharibyan
  • Thomas A. Brown
  • Patrick M. Grant
  • Roger A. Henderson
  • Kenton J. Moody
  • Scott J. Tumey
  • Dawn A. Shaughnessy
  • Ralf Sudowe
Article

Abstract

New procedures have been developed to isolate no-carrier-added (NCA) radionuclides of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of flerovium (Hg, Sn) and element 115 (Sb), produced by 12–15 MeV proton irradiation of foil stacks with the tandem Van-de-Graaff accelerator at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) facility. The separation of 113Sn from natIn foil was performed with anion-exchange chromatography from hydrochloric and nitric acid matrices. A cation-exchange chromatography method based on hydrochloric and mixed hydrochloric/hydroiodic acids was used to separate 124Sb from natSn foil. A procedure using Eichrom TEVA resin was developed to separate 197Hg from Au foil. These results demonstrate the suitability of using the CAMS facility to produce NCA radioisotopes for studies of transactinide homologs.

Keywords

No-carrier-added Homologs Transactinide Mercury Tin Antimony 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 11-ERD-011, as well as by the LLNL Livermore Graduate Scholar Program.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Despotopulos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kelly N. Kmak
    • 3
  • Narek Gharibyan
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Brown
    • 4
  • Patrick M. Grant
    • 1
  • Roger A. Henderson
    • 1
  • Kenton J. Moody
    • 1
  • Scott J. Tumey
    • 4
  • Dawn A. Shaughnessy
    • 1
  • Ralf Sudowe
    • 2
  1. 1.Nuclear and Chemical Sciences DivisionLawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA
  2. 2.University of Nevada, Las VegasLas VegasUSA
  3. 3.University of California BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.Center for Accelerator Mass SpectrometryLawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA

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