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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 299, Issue 2, pp 1073–1079 | Cite as

High intensity target wheel at TASCA: target wheel control system and target monitoring

  • E. Jäger
  • H. Brand
  • Ch. E. Düllmann
  • J. Khuyagbaatar
  • J. Krier
  • M. Schädel
  • T. Torres
  • A. Yakushev
Article

Abstract

At GSI Darmstadt, the gas-filled recoil separator transactinide separator and chemistry apparatus (TASCA) is in operation for experiments with superheavy elements. It is optimized for hot-fusion reactions with actinide targets. The small cross sections of such reactions require the capability to accept highest beam intensities. The limited availability of some of the exotic actinide isotopes limits the size of target systems. To maintain target integrity during long experiments, automated target monitoring and control is necessary. Here, the TASCA target wheel system and the on-line target monitoring are described.

Keywords

Superheavy element research High-intensity heavy-ion beam Gas-filled recoil separator TASCA Actinide targets Target wheel control 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge W. Hartmann, A. Hübner, B. Kindler, B. Lommel, and J. Steiner from the GSI Target Laboratory for providing carbon foils and titanium foils for target wheels; K. Eberhardt, J. V. Kratz, C. Mokry, J. Runke, P. Töhrle-Pospiech, and N. Trautmann from the Institute for Nuclear Chemistry at the University of Mainz for making electro-plated targets from lanthanides and actinides; and the staff of the ion source and UNILAC accelerator groups at GSI for providing highly intense and stable heavy ion beams.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Jäger
    • 1
  • H. Brand
    • 1
  • Ch. E. Düllmann
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. Khuyagbaatar
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. Krier
    • 1
  • M. Schädel
    • 1
  • T. Torres
    • 1
  • A. Yakushev
    • 1
  1. 1.GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbHDarmstadtGermany
  2. 2.Johannes Gutenberg-Universität MainzMainzGermany
  3. 3.Helmholtz-Institut MainzMainzGermany

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