Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 286, Issue 2, pp 303–308 | Cite as

Natural radionuclides in sediments and rocks from Adriatic Sea

Article

Abstract

During the International Scientific Cruise to Adriatic and Ionian Seas organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency, sediment and rock samples were collected. Sediments were sampled with grab corer at six locations in the Southeast Adriatic Sea. Rocks were collected on three islets in the Adriatic Sea. In the samples, natural radionuclides 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th, 226Ra and 210Pb were determined. After sampling and sample preparation, radiochemical separation procedures were applied. Then the samples were measured by alpha spectrometry system equipped with passivated implanted planar silicon detectors or by low background gas-flow proportional counter. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in samples were from 6.2 to 27.0 Bq/kg for 238U, from 7.9 to 28.1 Bq/kg for 234U, from 1.6 to 31.9 Bq/kg for 232Th, from 9.7 to 42.0 Bq/kg for 230Th, from 8.3 to 45.7 Bq/kg for 226Ra and from 3.0 to 113.4 for 210Pb. The obtained values are discussed in detail and compared with results of similar investigations carried out elsewhere.

Keywords

Natural radionuclides Sediments Rocks Adriatic Sea 

References

  1. 1.
    Stricht EVD, Kirchmann R (2001) Radioecology, radioactivity & ecosystems. Fortemps, LiegeGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    ISO 11464:1994(E) (1994) Soil quality—pretreatment of samples for physico-chemical analysesGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lozano JC, Fernandez F, Gomez JMG (1997) Determination of radium isotopes by BaSO4 coprecipitation for the preparation of alpha-spectrometric sources. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 223:133–137CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Jia G, Torri G, Innocenzi P (2004) An improved method for the determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by alpha-spectrometry. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 262:433–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sill CW (1961) Decomposition of refractory silicates in ultramicro analysis. Anal Chem 33:1684–1686CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Vreček P, Benedik L, Pihlar B (2004) Determination of 210Pb and 210Po in sediment and soil leachates and in biological materials using a Sr-resin column and evaluation of column reuse. Appl Radiat Isot 60:717–723CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Štrok M, Repinc U, Smodiš B (2008) Calibration and validation of a proportional counter for determining beta emitters. J Power Energy Syst 2:573–581CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Smodiš B, Štrok M (2007) Content of natural and artificial radionuclides in the Slovenian Sea. Report IJS-DP-9737, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (in Slovene)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Florou H, Kritidis P (1992) Gamma radiation measurements and dose rate in the coastal areas of a volcanic island, Aegean Sea, Greece. Radiat Prot Dosimetry 45:277–279Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sam AK, Ahmed MMO, El Khangi FA, El Nigumi YO, Holm E (1998) Radioactivity levels in the Red Sea coastal environment of Sudan. Mar Pollut Bull 36:19–26CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Noureddine A, Baggoura B (1997) Plutonium isotopes, 137Cs, 90Sr and natural radioactivity in marine sediments from Ghazaouet (Algeria). J Environ Radioact 34:127–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Moon D-S, Hong G-H, Kim YI, Baskaran M, Chung CS, Kim SH, Lee H-J, Lee S-H, Povinec PP (2003) Accumulation of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in bottom sediments of the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Res II 50:2649–2673CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Petrinec B, Franić Z, Leder N, Tsabaris C, Bituh T, Marović G (2010) Gamma radiation and dose rate investigations on the Adriatic islands of magmatic origin. Radiat Prot Dosimetry. doi:10.1093/rpd/ncp302

Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jožef Stefan InstituteLjubljanaSlovenia
  2. 2.Institute for Medical Research and Occupational HealthZagrebCroatia

Personalised recommendations