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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 273, Issue 2, pp 415–418 | Cite as

Accumulation of radiocesium by Pleurotus citrinopileatus species of edible mushroom

  • B. Mukhopadhyay
  • M. Nag
  • S. Laskar
  • S. Lahiri
Article

Abstract

Pleurotus citrinopileatus, a species of edible mushrooms, is widely accepted food component, especially in Indian subcontinent. The accumulating susceptibility of this edible mushroom species towards long-lived radioisotopes of cesium was studied in controlled laboratory condition using the 134Cs (T 1/2 = 2.06 y) radioisotope. It was observed that the experimental mushroom species accumulated 134Cs and maximum accumulation took place in the cap portion. The pileus (cap)/stipes (stem) ratio of each 134Cs accumulated mushroom sample was determined and found 2.22±0.74. The protein and fat fractions of the experimental mushroom species were extracted separately after accumulation of radiocesium and it was found that most of the radiocesium accumulation occurred in the protein fraction of the mushroom. The mushroom Pleurotus citrinopileatus which is white in color, turned completely black after radiocesium accumulation. The black mushroom so obtained was produced upto fourth generation by tissue culture method without using any radiocesium further. All the successors were found to be black indicating a permanent mutation of the mushroom species.

Keywords

Fruit Body Pleurotus Edible Mushroom Control Laboratory Condition Mushroom Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Mukhopadhyay
    • 1
  • M. Nag
    • 2
  • S. Laskar
    • 2
  • S. Lahiri
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Sciences DivisionSaha Institute of Nuclear PhysicsKolkataIndia
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryThe University of BurdwanGolapbag, BurdwanIndia

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