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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 673–684 | Cite as

Adolescents’ internalizing and aggressive behaviors and perceptions of parents’ psychological control: a panel study examining direction of effects

  • Arne K. Albrecht
  • Nancy L. Galambos
  • S. Mikael Jansson
Original Paper

Abstract

This panel study investigated the directionality of relations between adolescents’ perceptions of their parents’ psychological control and adolescents’ self-reported internalizing and aggressive (physical and relational) behaviors. Data were collected from a random, community sample of 530 adolescents ages 12–19 years old at time 1, and again 2 years later. Hierarchical regression analyses found that adolescents’ perceptions of parents’ psychological control at baseline did not predict changes in adolescents’ internalizing and aggressive behaviors over 2 years but higher internalizing behavior and physical aggression at time 1 predicted increases in adolescents’ estimates of their mothers’ and fathers’ psychologically controlling behaviors. Higher relational aggression reported by adolescents at time 1 predicted increases in their perceptions of mothers as psychologically controlling. This study provides more evidence for child effects on adolescents’ ratings of their parents’ psychological control than for parent effects of perceived psychological control on adolescents’ behavior.

Keywords

Parent–adolescent relations Psychological control Internalizing behaviors Physical aggression Relational aggression 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by a Canadian Institute of Health Research grant to Bonnie J. Leadbeater and colleagues.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arne K. Albrecht
    • 1
  • Nancy L. Galambos
    • 2
  • S. Mikael Jansson
    • 3
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of JenaJenaGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.Sociology DepartmentUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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