Journal of World Prehistory

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 75–100 | Cite as

Breaking the Bond: Investigating The Neolithic Expansion in Asia Minor in the Seventh Millennium BC

Article

Abstract

In the early seventh millennium BC an expansion of the Neolithic economy and sedentism took place in Asia Minor. This occurred nearly two millennia after the emergence of Neolithic societies in southern central Anatolia, which raises the question of how this expansion occurred, and why it came about at this particular moment. This paper considers various elements that might have played a role in this expansion episode, such as climate change, demography, and agricultural and social changes.

Keywords

Prehistory Near East Neolithic expansion Asia Minor 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This paper was written originally in the course of postdoctoral research funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University. I would like to thank the two anonymous referees for their helpful comments on this paper.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ArchaeologyLeiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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