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The Journal of Technology Transfer

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 187–207 | Cite as

A new approach to measuring technology with an application to the shape of the diffusion curves

  • Diego Comin
  • Bart Hobijn
  • Emilie Rovito
Article

Abstract

This paper documents the sources and measures of the cross-country historical adoption technology (CHAT) data set that covers the diffusion of about 115 technologies in over 150 countries over the last 200 years. We use this comprehensive data set to explore the shape of the diffusion curves. Our main finding is that, once the intensive margin is measured, technologies do not diffuse in a logistic way.

Keywords

Technology adoption Cross-country studies 

JEL Classifications

O33 O47 O57 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard University and NBERCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Federal Reserve Bank of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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