Journal of Scheduling

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 429–452 | Cite as

Configuration and the advantages of the shifting bottleneck procedure for optimizing the job shop total weighted tardiness scheduling problem

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Abstract

This paper answers two fundamental questions concerning the usage of the shifting bottleneck (SB) procedure to optimize the criterion total weighted tardiness for the classical job shop scheduling problem. The first question is how to configure the SB procedure, as it is a divide-and-conquer method and consists of diverse subsolutions for each procedure phase. The second question is what the advantages of the SB procedure are, in comparison with other state-of-the-art approaches. To answer the first question, we evaluate the performance (i.e. the scheduling quality) and the efficiency (i.e. the computational time) of various SB variants using computational experiments and present guidelines for configuring the SB procedure. To respond to the second question, extensive computational experiments were conducted on various benchmark instances (up to 100 jobs \(\times \) 20 machines). Results show the superior performance/efficiency trade-off of the SB variants with certain configuration to local search methods. This excellent trade-off between performance and efficiency makes the SB procedure particularly promising for solving practical production scheduling problems.

Keywords

Job shop Shifting bottleneck Total weighted tardiness Production scheduling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi Tan
    • 1
  • Torsten Hildebrandt
    • 1
  • Bernd Scholz-Reiter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BremenBremenGermany

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