Journal of Scheduling

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 301–314 | Cite as

On supporting Lean methodologies using constraint-based scheduling

  • Roman van der Krogt
  • John Geraghty
  • Mustafa Ramzi Salman
  • James Little
Article

Abstract

Lean Manufacturing—often simply referred to as “Lean”—is a process management philosophy that aims to improve the way in which products are manufactured. It does this through identifying and removing waste and creating a smooth transition between stages in the production process. To a large extent, it relies on visual and simple mechanical aids to assist in improving manufacturing effectiveness. However, when it comes to combining several aspects of Lean or when dealing with complex environments, quantitative modelling becomes essential to achieve the full benefits of Lean.

In this paper, we show through two detailed case studies how various aspects of Lean can be supported using (constraint-based) scheduling tools. One study concerns a planning support tool to evaluate different Lean initiatives; the other supports the day-to-day scheduling of a complex, Leaned production process

Lean manufacturing Constraint programming Scheduling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman van der Krogt
    • 1
  • John Geraghty
    • 2
  • Mustafa Ramzi Salman
    • 2
  • James Little
    • 1
  1. 1.Cork Constraint Computation Centre, Department of Computer ScienceUniversity College CorkCorkIreland
  2. 2.Enterprise Process Research Centre, Mechanical & Manufacturing EngineeringDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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