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Celebrating Sabbath as a Holistic Health Practice: The Transformative Power of a Sanctuary in Time

  • Barbara Baker SpeedlingEmail author
Original Paper
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Abstract

Sabbath-keeping has several holistic health benefits when done for intrinsic reasons. Most research on Sabbath-keeping is about individuals where Sabbath-keeping is customary. This organic inquiry describes how a Sabbath promoted transformation for ten women where Sabbath-keeping was not the norm. Six themes emerged: Sabbath-keeping enhanced self-awareness, improved self-care, enriched relationships, developed spirituality, positively affected the rest of a Sabbath-keeper’s week, and Sabbath-keeping practices and philosophies also evolved over time. The author argues that reviving the best parts of Sabbath-keeping is an effective, accessible, holistic practice that can contribute to the well-being of individuals, communities, and the earth.

Keywords

Sabbath Sabbath-keeping Spirituality and health Religion and health Holistic health Accessible holistic health practice Day of rest 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants followed the ethical standards of St. Catherine University’s Institutional Review Board and the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Holistic Health StudiesSt. Catherine UniversityMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Live ServicesRedBrick Health/Virgin Pulse, NBC-HWCMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.BloomingtonUSA

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