Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 514–530

HIV/AIDS Prevention, Faith, and Spirituality among Black/African American and Latino Communities in the United States: Strengthening Scientific Faith-Based Efforts to Shift the Course of the Epidemic and Reduce HIV-Related Health Disparities

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10943-011-9499-z

Cite this article as:
Sutton, M.Y. & Parks, C.P. J Relig Health (2013) 52: 514. doi:10.1007/s10943-011-9499-z

Abstract

Black/African American and Latino communities are disproportionately affected by the domestic HIV/AIDS epidemic. Blacks/African Americans and Latinos are also more likely to report a formal, religious, or faith affiliation when compared with non-Hispanic whites. As such, faith leaders and their institutions have been identified in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy as having a vital role to serve in reducing: (1) HIV-related health disparities and (2) the number of new HIV infections by promoting non-judgmental support for persons living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS and by serving as trusted information resources for their congregants and communities. We describe faith doctrines and faith–science partnerships that are increasing in support of faith-based HIV prevention and service delivery activities and discuss the vital role of these faith-based efforts in highly affected black/African American and Latino communities.

Keywords

HIV AIDS Faith Communities of color Disparities 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Centers for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Centers for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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