Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 49, Issue 4, pp 485–497

Religious Beliefs Affect Grieving After Pregnancy Loss

  • F. S. Cowchock
  • J. N. Lasker
  • L. J. Toedter
  • S. A. Skumanich
  • H. G. Koenig
Original Paper

Abstract

Religious beliefs and practices may aid in coping with bereavement and grief after pregnancy loss. Data from 103 women enrolled in the original Lehigh Valley Perinatal Loss Project, and who were followed-up for at least 1 year, were evaluated for the impact of initial religious practices and beliefs on the course and severity of grief. Religious practices corresponding to standard scales of religiosity and agreement with specific beliefs were rated by the women on a Likert scale of 1–5. Neither agreement with statements corresponding to extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity or to positive religious coping, nor frequency of religious service attendance was predictive of follow-up scores on the Perinatal Grief Scale. Religious struggle, agreement with statements classified as negative religious coping, and continued attachment to the baby were all associated with more severe grief.

Keywords

Pregnancy loss Grief/-ving Religiosity Religious beliefs Religious coping Religious struggle Continued attachment Continuing bonds 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. S. Cowchock
    • 1
  • J. N. Lasker
    • 2
  • L. J. Toedter
    • 3
  • S. A. Skumanich
    • 2
  • H. G. Koenig
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Spirituality, Theology and HealthDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Department Sociology and AnthropologyLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  3. 3.Department PsychologyMoravian CollegeBethlehemUSA

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