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Journal of Religion and Health

, 48:353 | Cite as

Chaplain–Physician Consultancy: When Chaplains and Doctors Meet in the Clinical Context

  • Lindsay B. Carey
  • Jeffrey Cohen
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper summarizes the perspectives of 327 Australian health care chaplains concerning their interaction with physicians within the clinical context. In general terms the findings indicated that nearly 90% of chaplains believed that it was part of their professional role to consult with physicians regarding patient/family issues. Differences of involvement between volunteer and staff chaplains, Catholic and Protestant, male and female chaplains and the type of chaplaincy training are noted, as are the perspectives of chaplaincy informants regarding their role in relation to physicians. Some implications of this study with respect to chaplaincy utility and training are noted.

Keywords

Chaplain–physician consultancy Pastoral care Pastoral medicine 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Appreciation is given to the School of Public Health, La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia), the ‘Wagstaff Bequest,’ Ormond College, University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia), the ‘Australian Health & Welfare Chaplains Association Incorporated,’ the ‘Love to the World Endowment’ (New South Wales, Australia), and the School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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Copyright information

© Blanton-Peale Institute 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Palliative Care Unit, School of Public HealthLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.School of Public Health and Community MedicineUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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