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Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS). A Psychometric Study of the Italian Version

  • Simona Tripaldi
  • Marina Paparusso
  • Massimo Amabili
  • Chiara Manfredi
  • Gabriele Caselli
  • Antonio Scarinci
  • Valeria Valenti
  • Clarice Mezzaluna
Article

Abstract

The Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS, Harrington 2005a) was developed as a multidimensional measure of frustration intolerance. Frustration intolerance plays an important role in behavioral and cognitive model of emotional problems (Harrington 2006). The aim of this study is to translate the original English version of FDS into Italian and to assess the validity and reliability of the Italian version for application among Italian population. The Italian version of FDS-R, with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered on-line to 497 subjects aged from 18 to 66 years old. The exploratory factor analysis suggested a solution with four factors, plus a general factor. The factor analysis supports a multidimensional model of frustration intolerance but the distribution of the items is different. The internal consistency appears optimal for all four factors (range .637–.866). Despite encouraging evidence, the factor structure and other features of the FDS-R are yet to be firmly established.

Keywords

Irrational belief Intolerance Factor analysis Rebt 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge Prof. Neil Harrington for providing a copy of the FDS-R and for granting permission for it to be used in the present study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simona Tripaldi
    • 1
  • Marina Paparusso
    • 1
  • Massimo Amabili
    • 1
  • Chiara Manfredi
    • 2
  • Gabriele Caselli
    • 2
  • Antonio Scarinci
    • 1
  • Valeria Valenti
    • 1
  • Clarice Mezzaluna
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PsychotherapyStudi CognitiviSan Benedetto del TrontoItaly
  2. 2.School of PsychotherapyStudi CognitiviModenaItaly

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