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Reducing Academic Procrastination Through a Group Treatment Program: A Pilot Study

  • Bilge Uzun Ozer
  • Ayhan Demir
  • Joseph R. Ferrari
Original Article

Abstract

The present study assessed a short-term group treatment program using cognitive interventions focused on students’ procrastination. A structured 90-min session program was used with 10 students (5 female, 5 male; M age = 21.8, SD = 3.2) across 5 weeks. In the first and last session of the program participants completed a two reliable and valid procrastination scales, and then 8 weeks later in the follow up sessions filled out the same questionnaires. During the group sessions, participants identified their irrational thoughts as well as cognitive distortions associated with their procrastination tendencies. Results of a non-parametric Friedman Test revealed a significant decrease in participants’ academic procrastination score and general procrastination scores from the pre-test to follow-up test suggesting that the program was deemed to be successful.

Keywords

Academic procrastination Irrational thoughts Group treatment REBT ABC model 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bilge Uzun Ozer
    • 1
  • Ayhan Demir
    • 2
  • Joseph R. Ferrari
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Educational SciencesCumhuriyet UniversitySivasTurkey
  2. 2.Middle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyDePaul UniversityChicagoUSA

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