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Frustration Intolerance: Therapy Issues and Strategies

  • Neil HarringtonEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

This article aims to provide an overview of the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) concept of frustration intolerance. Therapeutic issues regarding these beliefs are discussed, including engagement, the use of disputation, and behavioral techniques.

Keywords

Low frustration tolerance (LFT) Frustration intolerance Rational emotive behavior therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentStratheden HospitalCupar, Fife Health BoardUK

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