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The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 34, Issue 1–2, pp 109–115 | Cite as

Understanding Problems with Condom Fit and Feel: An Important Opportunity for Improving Clinic-Based Safer Sex Programs

  • Richard A. Crosby
  • Robin R. Milhausen
  • Kristen P. Mark
  • William L. Yarber
  • Stephanie A. Sanders
  • Cynthia A. Graham
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences and other demographic correlates of condom fit and feel problems among a diverse sample of adult condom users and to examine men’s and women’s perceptions and experiences with condom fit and feel problems. Participants were recruited from an electronic mailing list. The analytic sample (N = 949) included self-identified heterosexual men (n = 771) and women (n = 178) who reported using condoms for penile–vaginal or penile–anal intercourse in the past 3 months. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied. Of the sample, 38.3 % reported experiencing at least one condom fit or feel problem. Problems with condom fit during sex did not differ significantly by gender (p = .73). Perceptions of specific condom use problems were organized into five themes: (1) decreased sensation, (2) lack of naturalness, (3) condom size complaints, (4) decreased pleasure, and (5) pain and discomfort. In this diverse sample, there was a high prevalence of condom fit and feel issues among women as well as men. These issues, mostly focused on loss of pleasure, represent a substantial public health problem and thus warrant attention in safer sex programs.

Keywords

Condoms Condom use Condom fit Condom feel 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Support for this project was provided, in part, by The Social Justice and Sexual Health Research Centre at the University of Windsor, Ontario, The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, Indiana University, and the Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention, a joint project of Indiana University, the University of Colorado, and the University of Kentucky.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Crosby
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robin R. Milhausen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Kristen P. Mark
    • 5
  • William L. Yarber
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • Stephanie A. Sanders
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Cynthia A. Graham
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  1. 1.The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and ReproductionIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Rural Center for AIDS/STD PreventionIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Behavior, College of Public HealthUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Family Relations and Applied NutritionUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  5. 5.Department of Applied Health ScienceIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Gender StudiesIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychologyBrunel UniversityUxbridgeUK

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