The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 187–196

A Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program for American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome: The Balance Study

  • Elisa T. Lee
  • Jared B. Jobe
  • Jeunliang Yeh
  • Tauqeer Ali
  • Everett R. Rhoades
  • Allen W. Knehans
  • Diane J. Willis
  • Melanie R. Johnson
  • Ying Zhang
  • Bryce Poolaw
  • Billy Rogers
Research Methods and Practice

Abstract

The Balance Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 American Indian (AI) participants with metabolic syndrome who reside in southwestern Oklahoma. Major risk factors targeted include weight, diet, and physical activity. Participants are assigned randomly to one of two groups, a guided or a self-managed group. The guided group attends intervention meetings that comprise education and experience with the following components: diet, exercise, AI culture, and attention to emotional wellbeing. The self-managed group receives printed CVD prevention materials that are generally available. The duration of the intervention is 24 months. Several outcome variables will be compared between the two groups to assess the effectiveness of the intervention program.

Keywords

CVD prevention American Indians Holistic intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisa T. Lee
    • 1
  • Jared B. Jobe
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jeunliang Yeh
    • 1
  • Tauqeer Ali
    • 1
  • Everett R. Rhoades
    • 1
  • Allen W. Knehans
    • 4
  • Diane J. Willis
    • 1
  • Melanie R. Johnson
    • 1
  • Ying Zhang
    • 1
  • Bryce Poolaw
    • 5
  • Billy Rogers
    • 6
  1. 1.Center for American Indian Health Research, College of Public HealthUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences CenterOklahoma CityUSA
  2. 2.Division of Cardiovascular SciencesNational Heart, Lung and Blood InstituteBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Allied HealthUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences CenterOklahoma CityUSA
  5. 5.Lawton Indian HospitalLawtonUSA
  6. 6.Native WorkshopsNormanUSA

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