The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 32, Issue 5–6, pp 253–270

Mentoring Highly Aggressive Children: Pre–Post Changes in Mentors’ Attitudes, Personality, and Attachment Tendencies

  • Melissa A. Faith
  • Samuel E. Fiala
  • Timothy A. Cavell
  • Jan N. Hughes
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10935-011-0254-8

Cite this article as:
Faith, M.A., Fiala, S.E., Cavell, T.A. et al. J Primary Prevent (2011) 32: 253. doi:10.1007/s10935-011-0254-8

Abstract

This study examined the degree to which mentoring highly aggressive children was associated with changes in mentors’ attitudes, personality, and attachment tendencies. Participants were 102 college students who each mentored an aggressive, high-risk child across three academic semesters (spring, fall, spring). We examined pre- to post-mentoring changes in attitudes about mentoring efficacy and future parenting, Big Five personality characteristics, and attachment tendencies. Mentors also rated the impact of the mentoring relationship in their lives, and both mentors and mentees rated support of the mentoring relationship. Results indicated a statistically significant decrease over time in mentors’ ratings of self-efficacy, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness. These findings held even when controlling for ratings of relationship impact. However, mentors who rated the mentoring relationship as supportive tended to experience increased openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness and less attachment-related avoidance over time. Child-rated support negatively predicted mentors’ post-mentoring attitudes toward future parenting. Discussed are the potential costs of mentoring highly aggressive children and strategies that could help increase benefits to mentors.

Keywords

Mentoring Aggression Children Volunteer 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa A. Faith
    • 1
  • Samuel E. Fiala
    • 2
  • Timothy A. Cavell
    • 1
  • Jan N. Hughes
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Tarleton State UniversityKilleenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Educational PsychologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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