The Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 31, Issue 1–2, pp 69–83 | Cite as

Taking a Broad Approach to Public Health Program Adaptation: Adapting a Family-Based Diabetes Education Program

  • Kerstin M. Reinschmidt
  • Nicolette I. Teufel-Shone
  • Gail Bradford
  • Rebecca L. Drummond
  • Emma Torres
  • Floribella Redondo
  • Jo Jean Elenes
  • Alicia Sanders
  • Sylvia Gastelum
  • Martha Moore-Monroy
  • Salvador Barajas
  • Lourdes Fernandez
  • Rosy Alvidrez
  • Jill Guernsey de Zapien
  • Lisa K. Staten
Original Paper

Abstract

Diabetes health disparities among Hispanic populations have been countered with federally funded health promotion and disease prevention programs. Dissemination has focused on program adaptation to local cultural contexts for greater acceptability and sustainability. Taking a broader approach and drawing on our experience in Mexican American communities at the U.S.–Mexico Border, we demonstrate how interventions are adapted at the intersection of multiple cultural contexts: the populations targeted, the community- and university-based entities designing and implementing interventions, and the field team delivering the materials. Program adaptation involves negotiations between representatives of all contexts and is imperative in promoting local ownership and program sustainability.

Keywords

Program adaptation Diabetes Health promotion Mexican Americans U.S.–Mexico Border 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kerstin M. Reinschmidt
    • 1
  • Nicolette I. Teufel-Shone
    • 2
  • Gail Bradford
    • 2
  • Rebecca L. Drummond
    • 2
  • Emma Torres
    • 3
  • Floribella Redondo
    • 3
  • Jo Jean Elenes
    • 4
  • Alicia Sanders
    • 4
  • Sylvia Gastelum
    • 4
  • Martha Moore-Monroy
    • 2
  • Salvador Barajas
    • 2
  • Lourdes Fernandez
    • 5
  • Rosy Alvidrez
    • 5
  • Jill Guernsey de Zapien
    • 2
  • Lisa K. Staten
    • 6
  1. 1.Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention and Health Promotion, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public HealthUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public HealthUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  3. 3.Campesinos sin FronterasSomertonUSA
  4. 4.Platicamos SaludMariposa Community Health CenterNogalesUSA
  5. 5.Promotora Outreach OfficeUniversity of ArizonaDouglasUSA
  6. 6.Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention and Health Promotion, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public HealthUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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