Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 585–596

Pain-Related Work Interference is a Key Factor in a Worker/Workplace Model of Work Absence Duration Due to Musculoskeletal Conditions in Canadian Nurses

  • Eleanor Murray
  • Renée-Louise Franche
  • Selahadin Ibrahim
  • Peter Smith
  • Nancy Carnide
  • Pierre Côté
  • Jane Gibson
  • Jaime Guzman
  • Mieke Koehoorn
  • Cameron Mustard
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10926-012-9408-7

Cite this article as:
Murray, E., Franche, RL., Ibrahim, S. et al. J Occup Rehabil (2013) 23: 585. doi:10.1007/s10926-012-9408-7

Abstract

Objective To examine the role of pain experiences in relation to work absence, within the context of other worker health factors and workplace factors among Canadian nurses with work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) injury. Methods Structural equation modeling was used on a sample of 941 employed, female, direct care nurses with at least one day of work absence due to a work-related MSK injury, from the cross-sectional 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses. Results The final model suggests that pain severity and pain-related work interference mediate the impact of the following worker health and workplace factors on work absence duration: depression, back problems, age, unionization, workplace physical demands and low job control. The model accounted for 14 % of the variance in work absence duration and 46.6 % of the variance in pain-related work interference. Conclusions Our findings support a key role for pain severity and pain-related work interference in mediating the effects of workplace factors and worker health factors on work absence duration. Future interventions should explore reducing pain-related work interference through addressing workplace issues, such as providing modified work, reducing physical demands, and increasing job control.

Keywords

Work absence Musculoskeletal injuries Pain Multimorbidity Healthcare workers Depression 

Supplementary material

10926_2012_9408_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (48 kb)
Supplementary Figure 1: Initial theoretical model of worker factors associated with work absence duration due to work-related musculoskeletal injuries. (PDF 48 kb)
10926_2012_9408_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (78 kb)
Supplementary Figure 2: Final theoretical model of worker and workplace factors with significant pathways in model-building phase. (PDF 78 kb)
10926_2012_9408_MOESM3_ESM.doc (46 kb)
Supplementary Table 1: Survey items for work absence, worker health factors and workplace factors from the 2005 National Survey of Work and Health of Nurses (DOC 46 kb)
10926_2012_9408_MOESM4_ESM.doc (92 kb)
Supplementary Table 2: Survey item distributions across levels of work absence duration. Proportional distribution by work absence duration, and Chi squared p-values for univariate associations are presented with total sample size for each predictor variable category. (DOC 92 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleanor Murray
    • 1
    • 2
  • Renée-Louise Franche
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 8
  • Selahadin Ibrahim
    • 2
    • 8
  • Peter Smith
    • 2
    • 5
    • 8
  • Nancy Carnide
    • 2
    • 8
  • Pierre Côté
    • 6
    • 8
    • 10
  • Jane Gibson
    • 2
    • 9
  • Jaime Guzman
    • 7
  • Mieke Koehoorn
    • 3
  • Cameron Mustard
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Work & HealthTorontoCanada
  3. 3.School of Population and Public HealthUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  4. 4.Faculty of Health SciencesSimon Fraser UniversitySurreyCanada
  5. 5.School of Public Health and Preventive MedicineMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of Ontario Institute of TechnologyOshawaCanada
  7. 7.Division of Physical Medicine & RehabilitationUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  8. 8.Dalla Lana School of Public HealthUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  9. 9.Knowledge Transfer & Exchange ConsultantTorontoCanada
  10. 10.UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and RehabilitationUniversity of Ontario Institute of TechnologyOshawaCanada

Personalised recommendations