Journal of Polymers and the Environment

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 107–114

Kenaf/Ramie Composite for Automotive Headliner

  • Yan Chen
  • Liangfeng Sun
  • Ovidiu Chiparus
  • Ioan Negulescu
  • Val Yachmenev
  • Mary Warnock
Article

An increasing industrial interest is applications of kenaf and ramie fiber nonwovens for making automotive interior trim parts because of their excellent strength and renewability. This paper presents a study on the manufacture and evaluation of the kenaf/ramie nonwoven composite for this automotive end use. Carding, needle-punching, and wet bonding were used to fabricate the composite. End-use performance of the composite, in terms of tensile strength, thermal conductivity, dynamic mechanical property, and bonding structure, was tested using a series of instruments in accordance with the ASTM methods. Bonding performance of the polyvinyl alcohol binder and acrylic copolymer binder was also compared. Research results revealed that the acrylic-copolymer bonded composite was significantly anisotropic in both tensile and bending deformation and the polyvinyl-alcohol bonded composite was significantly anisotropic only in bending deformation. For the acrylic-copolymer bonded composite, increase of padding times helped enhance tensile properties. The acrylic-copolymer bonded composite also exhibited a better performance in dynamic thermal mechanical deformation but indicated insignificant difference of thermal conductivity compared to the polyvinyl-alcohol bonded composite.

Keywords

Kenaf ramie nonwoven composite automotive headliner mechanical and thermal properties 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    NASA (2003) NASA Tech Briefs, January 2003, pp. 22, 24Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Kemper and G. Hobi (2003) Adhesives & Sealants Industry, March 2003, pp. 22–24Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. H. Mueller, A. Krobjilowski, and J. Muessig (2001) in Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conferences, National Cotton Council of America, Memphis, TN, pp. 689–696Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. H. Muller and D. D. Stryjewski (2001) in Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conferences, National Cotton Council of America, Memphis, TN, pp. 714–717Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    ASTM1998Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vols. 07.01 and 07.02American Society for Testing and MaterialsPhiladelphia, PAGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Y. Chen (2001) in Proceedings of IFAI Expo 2001 Textile Technology Forum, The Textile Institute and Industrial Fabrics Association International, Nashville, TNGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    SAS Institute Inc.1990SAS/STAT User’s Guide, Version 6, Vols. 1 and 2, 4th EdSAS Institute Inc.Cary, NCGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yan Chen
    • 1
  • Liangfeng Sun
    • 1
  • Ovidiu Chiparus
    • 1
  • Ioan Negulescu
    • 1
  • Val Yachmenev
    • 2
  • Mary Warnock
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Human EcologyLouisiana State University Agricultural CenterBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.USDA ARS Southern Regional Research CenterNew OrleansUSA
  3. 3.School of Human Environmental SciencesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

Personalised recommendations