Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 29–41

The Deliberate Duchenne Smile: Individual Differences in Expressive Control

  • Sarah D. Gunnery
  • Judith A. Hall
  • Mollie A. Ruben
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10919-012-0139-4

Cite this article as:
Gunnery, S.D., Hall, J.A. & Ruben, M.A. J Nonverbal Behav (2013) 37: 29. doi:10.1007/s10919-012-0139-4

Abstract

We explored the ability to produce deliberate Duchenne smiles and individual differences in this ability. Participants engaged in both a role-play task, designed to measure quasi-naturalistic usage of the deliberate Duchenne smile, and an imitation task, designed to measure muscular capability. In the role-plays, participants were instructed to smile while enacting scripted scenarios, three representing faked positive (masked negative) affect and three representing genuine positive affect. In the imitation task, they were given photographs of Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiles to imitate. Rates of Duchenne smiling provided further evidence that substantial minorities of people have the ability to produce a Duchenne smile deliberately. Individual differences were evident in the consistency in producing deliberate Duchenne smiles across tasks, and in the relationship between deliberate Duchenne smiling and self-reported ability to put on convincing (false) emotion displays in everyday life.

Keywords

Deliberate Duchenne smiling Posing Individual differences Expressive control 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah D. Gunnery
    • 1
  • Judith A. Hall
    • 1
  • Mollie A. Ruben
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, 125 NINortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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