Journal of Medical Systems

, 42:25 | Cite as

A New Multi-Mode Perfusion System for Ex Vivo Heart Perfusion Study

  • Liming Xin
  • Bryan Gellner
  • Roberto Vanin Pinto Ribeiro
  • Giulia Maria Ruggeri
  • David Banner
  • Massimiliano Meineri
  • Vivek Rao
  • Jean Zu
  • Mitesh V. Badiwala
Systems-Level Quality Improvement
  • 205 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Systems-Level Quality Improvement

Abstract

Ex vivo heart perfusion has been shown to be an effective means of facilitating the resuscitation and assessment of donor hearts for cardiac transplantation. Over the last ten years however, only a few ex vivo perfusion systems have been developed for this application. While results have been promising, a system capable of facilitating multiple perfusion strategies on the same platform has not yet been realized. In this paper, the design, development and testing of a novel and modular ex vivo perfusion system is described. The system is capable of operating in three unique primary modes: the traditional Langendorff Mode, Pump-Supported Working-Mode, and Passive Afterload Working-Mode. In each mode, physiological hemodynamic parameters can be produced by managing perfusion settings. To evaluate heart viability, six experiments were conducted using porcine hearts and measuring several parameters including: pH, aortic pressure, lactate metabolism, coronary vascular resistance (CVR), and myocardial oxygen consumption. Pressure-volume relationship measurements were used to assess left ventricular contractility in each Working Mode. Hemodynamic and metabolic conditions remained stable and consistent across 4 h of ex vivo heart perfusion on the ex vivo perfusion system, validating the system as a viable platform for future development of novel preservation and assessment strategies.

Keywords

Ex vivo Perfusion system Cardiac Heart transplantation Biomechanics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liming Xin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bryan Gellner
    • 1
  • Roberto Vanin Pinto Ribeiro
    • 2
    • 3
  • Giulia Maria Ruggeri
    • 4
  • David Banner
    • 2
  • Massimiliano Meineri
    • 4
    • 5
  • Vivek Rao
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Jean Zu
    • 1
  • Mitesh V. Badiwala
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical & Industrial EngineeringUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Toronto General HospitalUniversity Health NetworkTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Institute of Medical ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Toronto General HospitalUniversity Health NetworkTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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