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Journal of Medical Systems

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 189–201 | Cite as

Heart Monitoring Garments Using Textile Electrodes for Healthcare Applications

  • Hyun-Seung Cho
  • Su-Min KooEmail author
  • Joohyeon Lee
  • Hakyung Cho
  • Da-Hye Kang
  • Ha-Young Song
  • Jeong-Whan Lee
  • Kang-Hwi Lee
  • Young-Jae Lee
Original Paper

Abstract

We measured the electrical activity signals of the heart through vital signs monitoring garments that have textile electrodes in conductive yarns while the subject is in stable and dynamic motion conditions. To measure the electrical activity signals of the heart during daily activities, four types of monitoring garment were proposed. Two experiments were carried out as follows: the first experiment sought to discover which garment led to the least displacement of the textile electrode from its originally intended location on the wearer’s body. In the second, we measured and compared the electrical activity signals of the heart between the wearer’s stable and dynamic motion states. The results indicated that the most appropriate type of garment sensing-wise was the “cross-type”, and it seems to stabilize the electrode’s position more effectively. The value of SNR of ECG signals for the “cross-type” garment is the highest. Compared to the “chest-belt-type” garment, which has already been marketed commercially, the “cross-type” garment was more efficient and suitable for heart activity monitoring.

Keywords

The electrical activity signals of the heart Textile electrodes Dry electrodes Modularized garment Vital monitoring 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy of the Korean Government.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyun-Seung Cho
    • 1
  • Su-Min Koo
    • 2
    Email author
  • Joohyeon Lee
    • 2
  • Hakyung Cho
    • 2
  • Da-Hye Kang
    • 2
  • Ha-Young Song
    • 2
  • Jeong-Whan Lee
    • 3
  • Kang-Hwi Lee
    • 3
  • Young-Jae Lee
    • 3
  1. 1.Research Institute of Clothing & Textile SciencesYonsei UniversitySeodaemun-guSouth Korea
  2. 2.School of Clothing & Textiles, College of Human EcologyYonsei UniversitySeodaemun-guSouth Korea
  3. 3.School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Biomedical & Life ScienceKonkuk UniversityChunhju-SiSouth Korea

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