Journal of Medical Systems

, 31:385

Home Internet Use among Hospice Service Recipients: Recommendations for Web-Based Interventions

  • Karla T. Washington
  • George Demiris
  • Debra Parker Oliver
  • Michele Day
Article

Abstract

A growing number of researchers are exploring strategies to improve hospice care through the use of web-based technologies. This study of 50 hospice patients and caregivers was conducted in order to obtain data describing home internet use among hospice service recipients. Over half (58%) of respondents reported having home internet access, with most using a dial-up connection. Primary reasons for accessing the web included e-mail and information searches. Findings suggest that the hospice industry should explore adopting web-based technologies as a strategy to enhance rather than replace traditional care. Providers must consider the strengths and potential limitations of patients and caregivers when designing online services. Specific recommendations for web-based hospice interventions are discussed at length.

Keywords

Hospice Internet Web-based interventions Palliative care End-of-life 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karla T. Washington
    • 1
  • George Demiris
    • 2
  • Debra Parker Oliver
    • 3
  • Michele Day
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, School of Nursing & Biomedical and Health InformaticsSchool of Medicine, University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family and Community MedicineUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbiaUSA

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