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Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 291–307 | Cite as

Conceptualizing the Research Culture in Postgraduate Medical Education: Implications for Leading Culture Change

  • Jennifer M. O’BrienEmail author
Article

Abstract

By recognizing symbols of research culture in postgraduate medical education, educators and trainees can gain a deeper understanding of the existing culture and mechanisms for its transformation. First, I identify symbolic manifestations of the research culture through a case narrative of a single anesthesia residency program, and I offer a visual conceptualization of the research culture. In the second part, I theorize the application of Senge’s (1994) disciplines of a learning organization and discuss leverage for enhancing research culture. This narrative account is offered to inform the work of enhancing the broader research culture in postgraduate medical education.

Keywords

Education, medical, graduate Research training Organizational culture Organizational learning Action research 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to thank Dr. Patrick Renihan for asking the candidacy exam question that inspired this paper.

Funding/support

Lownsborough Memorial Scholarship in Education College of Education, University of Saskatchewan 2011–2012; Educational Administration Graduate Scholarship, College of Education, University of Saskatchewan 2011–2012.

Disclosure of funding received

This work was supported by the Lownsborough Memorial Scholarship in Education and the Educational Administration Graduate Scholarship, College of Education, University of Saskatchewan 2011–2012.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Administration, College of EducationUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, College of MedicineUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  3. 3.Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain ManagementRoyal University HospitalSaskatoonCanada

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