Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 141–159

The Theatricalization of Death

Article
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Abstract

The essay analyzes anorexia as a theatrical performance, complete with its chosen acting school and particular dramatic features (plot, acting style, suspense-establishing mechanisms and motifs).

Keywords

Eating disorders Anorexia Theatre Acting Self-theatricalization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English and Department of General & Comparative LiteratureThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Department of EnglishHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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